The sun's bright rays are lost to sight

Full Text

1 The sun's bright rays are lost to sight,
Around us spreads the gloom of night;
Lord Jesus Christ, Thou light divine,
Let not our souls in darkness pine.

2 To Thee our fervent thanks we pay,
Whose mercy crowned us all this day;
For Thou didst send Thine angels fair,
Who kept us in their tender care.

3 Our sins and faults do Thou efface,
Vouchsafe to us Thy boundless grace;
By Thy forgiveness truly blest,
May we in sleep find peace and rest.

4 Thine angel guards from heaven send,
Against the foe protection lend;
O gracious Lord, for perils sore
Shield us tonight and evermore.

Amen.

Source: American Lutheran Hymnal #578

Author: Nikolaus Herman

Herman, Nicolaus, is always associated with Joachimsthal in Bohemia, just over the mountains from Saxony. The town was not of importance till the mines began to be extensively worked about 1516. Whether Herman was a native of this place is not known, but he was apparently there in 1518, and was certainly in office there in 1524. For many years he held the post of Master in the Latin School, and Cantor or Organist and Choirmaster in the church. Towards the end of his life he suffered greatly from gout, and had to resign even his post as Cantor a number of years before his death. He died at Joachimsthal, May 3, 1561. (Koch, i. 390-398; Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, xii. 186-188, &c.) He was a great friend and helper of J. Mathesius (q.v.)… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: The sun's bright rays are lost to sight
Author: Nikolaus Herman

Tune

MELCOMBE (Webbe)

Also known as: ST. PHILIPS BENEDICTION GRANTON NAZARETH MELCOMBE was first used as an anonymous chant tune (with figured bass) in the Roman Catholic Mass and was published in 1782 in An Essay on the Church Plain Chant. It was first ascribed to Samuel Webbe (the elder; b. London, England, 1740; d.…

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