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The wise men to thy cradle throne

The wise men to thy cradle throne

Author: Cecil Frances Alexander
Published in 10 hymnals

Author: Cecil Frances Alexander

Alexander, Cecil Frances, née Humphreys, second daughter of the late Major John Humphreys, Miltown House, co. Tyrone, Ireland, b. 1823, and married in 1850 to the Rt. Rev. W. Alexander, D.D., Bishop of Derry and Raphoe. Mrs. Alexander's hymns and poems number nearly 400. They are mostly for children, and were published in her Verses for Holy Seasons, with Preface by Dr. Hook, 1846; Poems on Subjects in the Old Testament, pt. i. 1854, pt. ii. 1857; Narrative Hymns for Village Schools, 1853; Hymns for Little Children, 1848; Hymns Descriptive and Devotional, 1858; The Legend of the Golden Prayers 1859; Moral Songs, N.B.; The Lord of the Forest and his Vassals, an Allegory, &c.; or contributed to the Lyra Anglicana, the S.P.C.K. Psalms and Hym… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: The wise men to thy cradle throne
Author: Cecil Frances Alexander
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

The wise men to Thy cradle throne. Cecil F. Alexander, née Humphreys. [Epiphany.] Published in her Hymns Descriptive and Devotional, &c, 1858, No. 8, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. Although seldom found in modern collections it is in Mrs. Alexander's best style. Possibly her interpretation of the gold, frankincense, and myrrh, as symbolizing love, prayer, and repentance, has made against the general adoption of the hymn. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 10 of 10)
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Christ in Song #128

Elim; or Hymns of Holy Refreshment #d110

Songs for the Sanctuary, or Hymns and Tunes for Christian Worship #ad1080

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Songs for the Sanctuary #290

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Songs for the Sanctuary #290

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Songs for the Sanctuary #290

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Songs for the Sanctuary; or, Psalms and Hymns for Christian Worship (Words only) #290

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Songs of the Soul #95

The Service of Praise #d313

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