Dear Friend of Hymnary,

As you know, we don't ask for money too often. But we're asking now.

So before you hit the "close" button on this box, please consider a donation to keep Hymnary going.

More than half a million people come here every month -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people who now have access to the most complete database of North American hymnody on the planet thanks to this site. But keeping all of this afloat does not come without a cost, and we have limited sources of revenue. So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do.

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by clicking the Donate button below, or you can send a check to Hymnary at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

On behalf of the entire Hymnary team,
Harry Plantinga

Life and Eternity

Thee, we adore, eternal name

Author: Isaac Watts
Published in 349 hymnals

Full Text

1 Thee, we adore, eternal name,
And humbly own to thee,
How feeble is our mortal frame,
What dying worms are we!

2 Our wasting lives grow shorter still,
As months and days increase,
And ev'ry beating pulse we tell,
Leaves but the number less.

3 The year rolls round, and steals away
The breath that first it gave;
Whate'er we do, whate'er we be,
We're trav'ling to the grave.

4 Dangers stand thick through all the ground,
To push us to the tomb;
And fierce diseases wait around,
To hurry mortals home.

5 Infinite joy, or wretched woe,
Attends on ev'ry breath;
And yet how unconcerned we go,
Upon the brink of death!

6 Waken, O Lord, our drowsy sense,
To walk this dang'rous road;
And if our souls are hurried hence,
May they be found with God.

Source: The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 #557

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Thee, we adore, eternal name
Title: Life and Eternity
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Thee we adore, eternal Name. I. Watts. [Life frail, Eternity unending, or New Year.] First published in his Hymns and Spiritual Songs, 1707 (2nd edition 1709, Bk. ii., No. 55), in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. It is found in a large number of hymnbooks in all English-speaking countries. The form of the text which is in the most extensive use is that given in the Psalms & Hymns of J. and C. Wesley in 1738, and continued in the revised edition of the Wesleyan Hymn Book, 1875, in which there are four slight changes from the original. The original came into use in the Church of England through M. Madan's Psalms & Hymns, 1760. In Dale's English Hymn Book, 1874, it begins with stanzas ii., “Our wasting lives grow shorter still.”

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline




Advertisements