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Thine, thine forever, blessed bond that knits

Author: Edward H. Bickersteth

Bickersteth, Edward Henry, D.D., son of Edward Bickersteth, Sr. born at Islington, Jan. 1825, and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (B.A. with honours, 1847; M.A., 1850). On taking Holy Orders in 1848, he became curate of Banningham, Norfolk, and then of Christ Church, Tunbridge Wells. His preferment to the Rectory of Hinton-Martell, in 1852, was followed by that of the Vicarage of Christ Church, Hampstead, 1855. In 1885 he became Dean of Gloucester, and the same year Bishop of Exeter. Bishop Bickersteth's works, chiefly poetical, are:— (l) Poems, 1849; (2) Water from the Well-spring, 1852; (3) The Rock of Ages, 1858 ; (4) Commentary on the New Testament, 1864; (5) Yesterday, To-day, and For Ever, 1867; (6) The Spirit of Life, 1868;… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Thine, thine forever, blessed bond that knits
Author: Edward H. Bickersteth

Notes

Thine, Thine for ever, blessed bond. Bishop E. H. Bickersteth. [Confirmation.] Written in 1870 for the first edition of the Hymnal Companion, and included therein in 1870. Also in his work The Two Brothers, 1871, p. 240, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. It is designed "To be sung after the benedictory prayer, “Defend, O Lord, this Thy servant with Thy heavenly grace, that he may continue Thine for ever," &c. It is a hymn of much beauty, and is very popular for Confirmations. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

AZMON

Lowell Mason (PHH 96) adapted AZMON from a melody composed by Carl G. Gläser in 1828. Mason published a duple-meter version in his Modern Psalmist (1839) but changed it to triple meter in his later publications. Mason used (often obscure) biblical names for his tune titles; Azmon, a city south of C…

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Timeline

Instances

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The Coronation Hymnal #d352

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The Praise Hymnary #362

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