To heav'n I lift my waiting eyes

To heav'n I lift my waiting eyes

Author: Isaac Watts
Published in 97 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1 To heav'n I lift my waiting eyes,
There all my hopes are laid:
The Lord that built the earth and skies
Is my perpetual aid.

2 Their steadfast feet shall never fall,
Whom he designs to keep;
His ear attends the softest call;
His eyes can never sleep.

3 He will sustain our weakest pow'rs
With his almighty arm,
And watch our most unguarded hours
Against surprising harm.

4 Isra'l rejoice, and rest secure,
Thy keeper is the Lord;
His wakeful eyes employ his pow'r
For thine eternal guard.

5 Nor scorching sun, nor sickly moon,
Shall have his leave to smite;
He shields thy head from burning noon,
From blasting damps at night.

6 He guards thy soul, he keeps thy breath,
Where thickest dangers come:
Go and return, secure from death,
Till God commands thee home.

Source: Church Hymn Book: consisting of newly composed hymns with the addition of hymns and psalms, from other authors, carefully adapted for the use of public worship, and many other occasions (1st ed.) #P.CXXI

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: To heav'n I lift my waiting eyes
Author: Isaac Watts
Language: English




ST. MATTHEW was published in the <em>Supplement to the New Version of Psalms by Dr. Brady and Mr. Tate</em> (1708), where it was set to Psalm 33 and noted as a new tune. The editor of the <em>Supplement,</em> William Croft (<a href="/hymn/PsH/149#tuneinfo">PHH…

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