To the Christian legions comes the sweet command

To the Christian legions comes the sweet command

Author: Neal A. McAulay
Tune: [To the Christian legions comes the sweet command]
Published in 5 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

To the Christian legions comes the sweet command,
Tell the story, tell the story,
Spread the glorious tidings over sea and land,
Tell the story o’er and o’er.

Chorus:
Tell the story, let its music ring,
Sweetly peal redeeming grace!
Tell the story, let the ransomed sing,
Till the world the truth embrace.

There are countless millions in the gloom of night,
Tell the story, tell the story,
Shall the Christian nations give them saving light?
Tell the story o’er and o’er.

To the heathen nations o’er the wide, wide world,
Tell the story, tell the story,
Let the gospel banner be at once unfurled,
Tell the story o’er and o’er.

Let us never falter in the work of love,
Tell the story, tell the story,
Till the Master calls us to our rest above,
Tell the story o’er and o’er.


Source: Twentieth (20th) Century Songs Part One #84

Author: Neal A. McAulay

McAulay, Neal A. (Nova Scotia, March, 1854--?). Born of Scottish parents "in the English town of Nova Scotia." At age 21 he moved to Boston and from there to Portland, Maine, in 1876. Converted in 1877; went to Chicago in 1882, and entered McCormick Theological Seminary in 1883 (B.D., 1886). Pastorates in Presbyterian churches in Wilton, Iowa (1886-1907) and Lyons, Louisiana (1907-?). In 1889 began writing gospel hymns. --Gabriel, Charles H. (1916). Singers and Their Songs. Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company. Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: To the Christian legions comes the sweet command
Author: Neal A. McAulay
Refrain First Line: Tell the story, let its music ring

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 5 of 5)

Carmina Sacra #d207

Fillmore's Women's Choir, Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Combined #d97

Page Scan

Sifted Wheat #4

Page Scan

Special Songs #4

TextAudioPage Scan

Twentieth (20th) Century Songs Part One #84

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