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There Is No Name So Sweet on Earth

Representative Text

We love to sing of Christ, our King,
and hail Him blessed Jesus;
for there's no word ear ever heard
so dear, so sweet as "Jesus."


Source: Celebrating Grace Hymnal #608

Author: George W. Bethune

Bethune, George Washington, D.D. A very eminent divine of the Reformed Dutch body, born in New York, 1805, graduated at Dickinson Coll., Carlisle, Phila., 1822, and studied theology at Princeton. In 1827 he was appointed Pastor of the Reformed Dutch Church, Rinebeck, New York. In 1830 passed to Utica, in 1834 to Philadelphia, and in 1850 to the Brooklyn Heights, New York. In 1861 he visited Florence, Italy, for his health, and died in that city, almost suddenly after preaching, April 27, 1862. His Life and Letters were edited by A. R. Van Nest, 1867. He was offered the Chancellorship of New York University, and the Provostship of the University of Pennsylvania, both of which he declined. His works include The Fruits of the Spirit, 1839; Ser… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: We love to sing of Christ our King
Title: There Is No Name So Sweet on Earth
Author: George W. Bethune
Meter: 8.7.8.7
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

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Instances

Instances (1 - 3 of 3)
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Celebrating Grace Hymnal #608

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The Celebration Hymnal #6

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The Hymnal for Worship and Celebration #100

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