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What, ye ask me, is my prize

Representative text cannot be shown for this hymn due to copyright.

Author: Johann C. Schwedler

Schwedler, Johann Christoph, son of Anton Schwedler, farmer and rural magistrate at Krobsdorf, near Lowenberg, in Silesia, was born at Krobsdorf, Dec. 21, 1672, and matriculated at the University of Leipzig, in 1695 (M.A. 1697). In 1698 he was appointed assistant minister at Niederwiese, near Greiffenberg, and began his duties there on the 18th Sunday after Trinity. On the death of the diaconus, Christoph Adolph, he succeeded him as diaconus, in December, 1698; and, finally, in 1701, he became pastor there. He died at Niederwiese, suddenly, during the night of Jan. 12, 1730. Schwedler was a powerful and popular preacher, and peculiarly gifted in prayer. It is said that sometimes, beginning service at 5 or 6 a.m., he would continue the ser… Go to person page >

Translator: George Ratcliffe Woodward

Educated at Caius College in Cambridge, England, George R. Woodward (b. Birkenhead, Cheshire, England, 1848; d. Highgate, London, England, 1934) was ordained in the Church of England in 1874. He served in six parishes in London, Norfolk, and Suffolk. He was a gifted linguist and translator of a large number of hymns from Greek, Latin, and German. But Woodward's theory of translation was a rigid one–he held that the translation ought to reproduce the meter and rhyme scheme of the original as well as its contents. This practice did not always produce singable hymns; his translations are therefore used more often today as valuable resources than as congregational hymns. With Charles Wood he published three series of The Cowley Carol Book (19… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: What, ye ask me, is my prize
Author: Johann C. Schwedler
Translator: George Ratcliffe Woodward
Copyright: Words from "Songs of Syon" edited by G. R.Woodward, by permission of the copyright owner

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)

The Hymnal #331

Trinity Hymnal #435

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