Why do the Heathen madly rage

Why do the Heathen madly rage

Author: John Barnard
Published in 1 hymnal

Full Text

1. Why do the heathen madly rage.
And in assembled tumults join?
Why do rash people thus engage,
And such vain fruitless schemes design?
2. Kings of the earth their force unite,
And rulers their deep plots contrive;
Against the Lord they vent their spite,
Against his Christ they boldly strive.

3 Come, say they, let us break their bands,
"Shall we our homage to them pay?
We'll ne'er be slaves to their commands,
We'll cast their servile cords away."
4. But he who sits enthroned on high,
Beholds with a disdainful smile;
The Lord who rules above the sky,
Derides their strength, their rage, and guile.

5. Then to them, in his wrath, he speaks.
While vengeance in his thunder rowls;
His hot displeasure on them breaks,
And sore vexation fills their souls.
6. "Know ye, that I have fix'd the throne,
Of mine anointed King most sure,
On Zion's sacred hill alone;
There it forever stands secure.

7 "This is the firm decree I've made,
'Tis past in Heaven, and changeth not;
Thou art my Son, (Jehovah said)
This very Day I Thee begot.
8. "Ask, now, my Son, I'll freely give;
Inherit thou the heathen lands;
Through utmost bounds of earth receive
Subjection to thy just commands.

9. "Thou shalt them crush, who dare oppose,
As with a massy iron rod;
Thou shalt in pieces dash thy foes,
As potters vessels spread abroad.
10. Be wise, now, O ye Kings, and hear.
Ye judges of the earth, his voice:
11. Serve ye the Lord with inward fear,
Before him tremble, and rejoice.

12. Kiss ye the Son, lest in the way
Ye perish, when his anger glows;
Lest kindling wrath your crimes repay,
Bless'd all in him their trust repose.

A New Version of the Psalms of David, 1752

Author: John Barnard

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Text Information

First Line: Why do the Heathen madly rage
Author: John Barnard
Place of Origin: Marblehead, Massachusetts
Language: English
Publication Date: 1752
Copyright: This text in in the public domain in the United States because it was published before 1923.



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