With steady pace, the pilgrim moves

With steady pace, the pilgrim moves

Author: Richard Jukes
Tune: [With steady pace the pilgrim moves]
Published in 8 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

WITH steady pace the pilgrim moves
Toward the blissful shore,
And sings with cheerful heart and voice:
‘Tis better on before.

2 His passage through a desert lies,
Where furious lions roar;
He takes his staff, and smiling says:
‘Tis better on before.

3 When tempted to forsake his God
And give the contest o’er,
He hears a voice which says: Look up,
‘Tis better on before.

4 When stern affliction clouds his face,
And death stands at the door,
Hope cheers him with her happiest note:
‘Tis better on before.

5 And when on Jordan’s bank he stands,
And views the radiant shore,
Bright angels whisper: Come away,
‘Tis better on before.

6 And so it is, for high in Heaven
They never suffer more;
Eternal calm succeeds the storm,
‘Tis better on before.


Source: The Song Book of the Salvation Army #911

Author: Richard Jukes

Born: October 9, 1804, Clungunford, Shropshire, England. Died: August 10, 1867, West Bromwich, England. Rev. Richard Jukes (1804–1867) was a popular Primitive Methodist Minister and hymn writer. Richard Jukes was born on 9 October 1804 at Goat Hill, and died 10 August 1869. He served as a Primitive Methodist Minister from 1827 to 1859. Jukes married Phoebe Pardoe in 1825, and later, widowed, he married Charlotte. While Richard Jukes left his mark in Kendall's history as a hymn writer, his work as a Minister was widely appreciated. It is noteworthy that, after a number of appointments where he would have been the junior, Jukes was appointed to three of the most significant Circuits of that time. Tunstall, Staffordshire was the pl… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: With steady pace, the pilgrim moves
Author: Richard Jukes
Refrain First Line: 'Tis better on before

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Text

The Song Book of the Salvation Army #911

Include 7 pre-1979 instances
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