Yes, pray and wait

Yes, pray and wait

Author: Mary D. James
Tune: [Yes, pray and wait]
Published in 1 hymnal

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Yes, pray and wait, poor, tempted, sorrowing one,
Though all obscured by clouds the cheering sun;
Though rough and thorny be thy heavenward path;
Oh, falter not, nor faint, in God have faith;
Still pray and wait, pray and wait, pray and wait.

2 Tho’ all around seem dark, and drear, and cold,
And naught to cheer thee in this desert world;
In darkness oft arises glorious light,
And brightest morning from a stormy night,
Oh, pray and wait, pray and wait, pray and wait.

3 When faint and sad thy burdened soul would sink,
Then of thy loving Father’s promise think;
And trust thy faithful covenant keeping God,
And rest thee on his sure, unfailing word,
Still pray and wait, pray and wait, pray and wait.

4 In furnace fires our graces must be tried
Until from nature’s dross all purified,
And he, the great Refiner, shall behold
His lovely image shining in the gold,
We’ll pray and wait, pray and wait, pray and wait.

Source: The Ark of Praise #66

Author: Mary D. James

Mary Dagworthy Yard James USA 1810-1883. Born at Trenton, NJ, she began teaching Sunday school at age 13 in the Methodist Episcopal Church. She married Henry B James, and they had four children: Joseph, Mary, Ann, and Charles.. She became a prominent figure in the Wesleyan Holiness movement of the early 1800s, assisting Phoebe Palmer (also a hymnist) and often leading meetings at Ocean Grove, NJ, and elsewhere. She wrote articles that appeared in the “Guide to holiness”, “The New York Christian advocate”, “The contributor”, “The Christian witness:, “The Christian woman”, “The Christian standard”, and the “Ocean Grove record”. She wrote a biography of Edmund J Yard entitled, “The soul winner” (1883). She… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Yes, pray and wait
Author: Mary D. James
Copyright: Public Domain

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The Ark of Praise #66

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