BROMLEY (Haydn)

BROMLEY (Haydn)

Composer: Joseph Haydn (1794)
Published in 23 hymnals


Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI, Recording

Composer: Joseph Haydn

Franz Joseph Haydn (b. Rohrau, Austria, 1732; d. Vienna, Austria, 1809) Haydn's life was relatively uneventful, but his artistic legacy was truly astounding. He began his musical career as a choirboy in St. Stephen's Cathedral, Vienna, spent some years in that city making a precarious living as a music teacher and composer, and then served as music director for the Esterhazy family from 1761 to 1790. Haydn became a most productive and widely respected composer of symphonies, chamber music, and piano sonatas. In his retirement years he took two extended tours to England, which resulted in his "London" symphonies and (because of G. F. Handel's influence) in oratorios. Haydn's church music includes six great Masses and a few original hymn tune… Go to person page >

Tune Information

Title: BROMLEY (Haydn)
Composer: Joseph Haydn (1794)
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Incipit: 13421 35565 44314
Key: F Major
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

The tune BROMLEY is usually credited to Jeremiah Clarke (1674-1707) but there is an authorship problem: the first published use of the tune and setting was Franz Josef Haydn's "O let me in th'accepted hour," a metrical setting of Psalm 69 in Improved Psalmody (1794). The earliest extant version attributed to Clarke would not appear for another 15 years - more than a century after his death - in organist William Russell's 1809 compilation of Psalms, hymns, and anthems for use in the chapel of the Foundling Hospital. Moreover, the earlier volume, Improved Psalmody, includes five other settings of Haydn, along with other settings with citations to Clarke, but not this one. The editor of the later compilation (Russell) is known to have quoted Haydn in other works, and numerous indexes of the day cite his authorship of Six anthems adapted from the works of Haydn, etc., dated just one year later the Haydn version appeared. The tune's name is that of a town near London, and its four-part voicing was arranged for the 1920 Yattendon Hymnal by Mary Bridges, including the 1809 trio from Russell, and attribution to Clarke.

David Maurand, used by permission, from www.hymndescants.org (accessed 9-17-2018)

Media

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary #600
  • Four-part harmony, full-score (PDF, NWC)
The Cyber Hymnal #4700
Text: O Blest Creator of the Light
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
The Cyber Hymnal #5405
Text: O Trinity of Blessèd Light
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 8 of 8)
ScoreAudio

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary #600

Audio

Small Church Music #1401

Audio

Small Church Music #1402

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #4700

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #5405

The Hymnal 1982 #28

TextPage Scan

The Hymnal 1982 #29

Text

Together in Song #510

Include 15 pre-1979 instances
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