My God, And Is Thy Table Spread

Representative Text

1 My God, and is thy table spread,
and doth thy cup with love o'erflow?
Thither be all thy children led,
and let them all thy sweetness know.

2 Hail, sacred feast which Jesus makes,
rich banquet of his flesh and blood!
Thrice happy he who here partakes
that sacred stream, that heavenly food.

3 Why are its bounties all in vain
before unwilling hearts displayed?
Was not for them the Victim slain?
Are they forbid the children's bread?

4 O let thy table honoured be,
and furnished well with joyful guests;
and may each soul salvation see,
that here its sacred pledges tastes.

Source: Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #455

Author: Philip Doddridge

Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Nort… Go to person page >

Notes

My God, and is Thy table spread, p. 779, i. In the 1904 ed. of Hymns Ancient & Modern, the doxology in the old ed. has been replaced by the concluding stanza of Doddridge's hymn.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Tune

ROCKINGHAM (Miller)

Edward Miller (b. Norwich, England, 1735; d. Doncaster, Yorkshire, England, 1807) adapted ROCKINGHAM from an earlier tune, TUNEBRIDGE, which had been published in Aaron Williams's A Second Supplement to Psalmody in Miniature (c. 1780). ROCKINGHAM has long associations in Great Britain and North Amer…

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BROMLEY (Haydn)

The tune BROMLEY is usually credited to Jeremiah Clarke (1674-1707) but there is an authorship problem: the first published use of the tune and setting was Franz Josef Haydn's "O let me in th'accepted hour," a metrical setting of Psalm 69 in Improved Psalmody (1794). The earliest extant version attr…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #4236
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
The Cyber Hymnal #5053
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 16 of 16)
Text

Ancient and Modern #455

Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #515

Church Hymnal, Fifth Edition #433

Page Scan

Common Praise #313

Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #456

TextPage Scan

Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #323

Text

Hymnal 1982 #321

TextPage Scan

Hymnal Supplement 1991 #769

Hymns Ancient and Modern, New Standard Edition #259

Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #418

Hymns Old and New #342

Sing Glory #474

The Christian Life Hymnal #328

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #4236

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #5053

Text

Together in Song #510

Include 184 pre-1979 instances
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