261

Shout, for the Blessed Jesus Reigns

Full Text

1 Shout, for the blessed Jesus reigns;
through distant lands his triumphs spread.
And sinners freed from endless pains,
own him their Savior and their Head.

2 He calls his chosen from afar;
they all at Zion's gates arrive.
Those who were dead in sin before
by sovereign grace are made alive.

3 Gentiles and Jews his laws obey.
All lands and nations offerings bring
and, unconstrained, their homage pay
to their exalted God and King.

4 Oh, may his holy church increase,
his Word and Spirit still prevail,
while angels celebrate his praise
and saints his growing glories hail.

5 Loud hallelujahs to the Lamb
from all below and all above!
In lofty songs exalt his name,
in songs as lasting as his love.

see more

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

The text "shouts" the cosmic reign of Christ over all nations, a reign that is joyfully confessed by his chosen people on earth and celebrated by saints and angels in heaven. In the midst of these powerful exclamations of praise to Christ the Lamb comes a prayer for the increase of the church (st. 4). This is presumably one of the earliest "church growth" hymns!

 

Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 21, Question and Answer 54 confesses that the ascended Jesus Christ is now “head of his church, the one through whom the Father rules all things” and “through his Word and Spirit, out of the entire human race, gathers…a community chosen for eternal life...”

261

Shout, for the Blessed Jesus Reigns

Tune Information

Name
TRURO
Key
C Major
Meter
8.8.8.8

Recordings

261

Shout, for the Blessed Jesus Reigns

Hymn Story/Background

The text "shouts" the cosmic reign of Christ over all nations, a reign that is joyfully confessed by his chosen people on earth and celebrated by saints and angels in heaven. In the midst of these powerful exclamations of praise to Christ the Lamb comes a prayer for the increase of the church (st. 4). This is presumably one of the earliest "church growth" hymns!
 
Benjamin Beddome, a British Baptist preacher, wrote this text. It was published in the Bristol Collection of Hymns adapted to Public Worship (1769), compiled by John Ash and Caleb Evans.
 
TRURO is an anonymous tune, first published in Thomas Williams's Psalmodia Evangelica, (second vol., 1789) as a setting for Isaac Watts' "Now to the Lord a noble song." Virtually nothing is known about this eighteenth-century British editor of the two-volume Psalmodia Evangelica, a collection of three-part psalm and hymn tunes for "Churches, Chapels, and Dissenting Meetings in England, Scotland, and Ireland." The tune is named for an ancient city in Cornwall, England, famous for its cathedral and for its pottery.
 
TRURO's opening phrase ascends the octave. The entire tune is influenced by George F. Handel's style and bears relationship to similar tunes, like DUKE STREET. Sing stanzas 1 and 5 in unison, stanzas 2-4 in harmony with stanza 4 unaccompa­nied. Use clear articulation on the organ and a moderate tempo.
 
Sing the outer stanzas in unison, the middle ones in harmony. This tune needs brisk accompaniment and would be enhanced by brass instruments.
— Bert Polman

Author Information

Benjamin Beddome (b. Henley-in Arden, Warwickshire, England, 1717; d. Bomton, Gloucestershire, England, 1795), a British Baptist preacher, wrote this text. It was published in the Bristol Collection of Hymns adapted to Public Worship (1769), compiled by John Ash and Caleb Evans.
 
Beddome originally pursued a medical degree and was apprenticed to a surgeon. However, after his conversion at age twenty, he became pastor of the Baptist congrega­tion at Bourton-on-the-Water in Gloucestershire, where he remained until his death. Beddome wrote more than eight hundred hymn texts, many of which were composed to be sung by his congregation after the morning sermon.
— Bert Polman

Composer Information

Regarding Thomas Williams (b. circa 1700; d. circa 1800) of Clerkenwell Green, virtually nothing is known about this eighteenth-century British editor of the two-volume Psalmodia Evangelica, a collection of three-part psalm and hymn tunes for "Churches, Chapels, and Dissenting Meetings in England, Scotland, and Ireland.
— Bert Polman
You have access to this FlexScore.
Download:
Are parts of this score outside of your desired range? Try transposing this FlexScore.
General Settings
Stanza Selection
Voice Selection
Text size:
Music size:
Transpose (Half Steps):
Capo:
Contacting server...
Contacting server...

Questions? Check out the FAQ

A separate copy of this score must be purchased for each choir member. If this score will be projected or included in a bulletin, usage must be reported to a licensing agent (e.g. CCLI, OneLicense, etc).

This is a preview of your FlexScore.
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.