We don't often ask for money. Just twice a year. This is one of those times. 

So, please, before you hit the "close" button on this box, would you consider a donation to keep Hymnary.org going? 

In April 2020, according to Google Analytics, our Hymnary website had roughly 1.5 million sessions from approximately 1 million users. Both numbers were up 40% from April 2019. Amazing. And what a blessing! But it is expensive to serve all of these people -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people like you who love hymns.

And we have limited sources of revenue. This fund drive is one critical source. 

So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do. 

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by sending a check to Hymnary.org at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546, or you can click the Donate button below. 

On behalf of the entire Hymnary.org team,
Harry Plantinga

354

LORD, I Gladly Trust

Scripture References

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

The beautiful expressions of trust that we find in especially stanzas 1 and 2 can only come from someone who knows the deep comfort of Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 1, Question and Answer 1: “…I belong—body and soul, in life and in death—to my faithful savior Jesus Christ.” Only such a person can profess in stanza 4, “Lord, I gladly trust in you.”

354

LORD, I Gladly Trust

Additional Prayers

Loving God, you teach us, you lead us,
you protect us, you forgive us.
In life and in death we belong to you.
We long for your Holy Spirit
to strengthen us in our walk with you.
Give us joy, peace, and patience
as we learn, more and more,
to place our full trust in you. Amen.
— Lift Up Your Hearts (http://www.liftupyourheartshymnal.org)

Loving God,
you teach us, you lead us, you protect us, you forgive us.
Help us to trust you more each day,
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, now and forever. Amen.
— Psalms for All Seasons (http://www.psalmsforallseasons.org)
354

LORD, I Gladly Trust

Tune Information

Name
REDHEAD 76
Key
D Major
Meter
7.7.7.7.7.7

Recordings

354

LORD, I Gladly Trust

Hymn Story/Background

REDHEAD 76 is named for its composer, who published it as number 76 in his influential Church Hymn Tunes, Ancient and Modem (1853) as a setting for the hymn text "Rock of Ages." It has been associated with Psalm 51 since the 1912 Psalter, where the tune was named AJALON. The tune is also known as PETRA from its association with "Rock of Ages," and GETHSEMANE, which derives from the text "Go to Dark Gethsemane."
 
Of the three long lines constituting REDHEAD 76, the last is almost identical to the first, and the middle line has an internal repeat. Well-suited to singing in parts, this music is also appropriate for unaccompanied singing.
— Bert Polman

Author Information

Martin Leckebusch (b. Leicester, England, 1962) was educated at Oriel College before going on to study Mathematics at Oxford and Numerical Analysis at Brunel University. He and his wife, Jane, have four daughters; their second child, a son, died in 1995. The family live in Gloucester and belong to a Baptist church.
 
Martin’s work in hymnody over the past twenty-five years has resulted in almost 400 hymn texts, of which around half have so far been published by Kevin Mayhew. These include the ever-popular More than Words and Songs of God’s People – books which have cemented his status as a talented and accomplished hymn writer.
 
Martin is keen to see the church equipped for Christian living, and believes that well-crafted and wisely-used contemporary hymns and songs have a vital role to play in that process.
— Kevin Mayhew Publishing (http://www.kevinmayhew.com/)

Composer Information

Richard Redhead (b. Harrow, Middlesex, England, 1820; d. Hellingley, Sussex, England, 1901) was a chorister at Magdalen College, Oxford. At age nineteen he was invited to become organist at Margaret Chapel (later All Saints Church), London. Greatly influencing the musical tradition of the church, he remained in that position for twenty-five years as organist and an excellent trainer of the boys' choirs. Redhead and the church's rector, Frederick Oakeley, were strongly committed to the Oxford Movement, which favored the introduction of Roman elements into Anglican worship. Together they produced the first Anglican plainsong psalter, Laudes Diurnae (1843). Redhead spent the latter part of his career as organist at St. Mary Magdalene Church in Paddington (1864-1894).
— Bert Polman
Hymnary.org does not have a score for this hymn.
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.