605

Digno es Jesús (Worthy Is Christ)

Full Text

1 Worthy is Christ, worthy is Christ;
to him be praise and glory: worthy is the Lord.

2 He gave his life, he died for me;
to him be praise and glory: worthy is the Lord.

Spanish:
1 Digno, es Jesús, digno es Jesús;
de recibir la gloria, digno es Jesús.

2 Su vida dio, por mí murió;
de recibir la gloria, digno es Jesús.

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Scripture References

Thematically related:

Further Reflections on Scripture References

The text is a personal testimonial of praise derived from two of the great doxologies in the last book of the New Testament, which are sung in praise of the Lamb, Jesus Christ:

 

     You are worthy. . .

     because you were slain,

     and with your blood you purchased men for God

     from every tribe and language and people and nation. . . .

     Worthy is the Lamb, who was slain,

     to receive power and wealth and wisdom and strength and honor and glory and praise!

 

  -Revelation 5:9, 12

Bert Polman, Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Sometimes the soul of the Christian needs to cry out exuberantly with joy, thanks, and adoration, even without identifying the reasons for such praise and adoration. Moreover, Christians who gather corporately find it fitting to do so as the grateful body of Christ. The Confessions of the church recognize this natural expression. Belgic Confession, Article 1 sees God as the “overflowing source of all good,” and such a realization deserves an “Alleluia!” Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 1, Question and Answer 2 is a reminder that living in the joy of our comfort involves a spirit of thanks for his deliverance. In the same spirit, Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 2 exclaims, “God is King: Let the earth be glad! Christ is victor: his rule has begun! The Spirit is at work: creation is renewed!” and then as a natural response cries: “Hallelujah! Praise the Lord!”

605

Digno es Jesús (Worthy Is Christ)

Tune Information

Name
DIGNO ES JESÚS
Key
F Major

Recordings

605

Digno es Jesús (Worthy Is Christ)

Hymn Story/Background

Like many other Hispanic choruses, this is a true folk song in that it has an anonymous author, composer, and source. 'Worthy Is Christ" was submitted by members of the Hispanic task force that provided recommendations to the 1987 Psalter Hymnal Revision Committee. The task force knew the song from memory and presented it to the committee by singing it. Psalter Hymnal 1987 editor Emily R. Brink notated the hymn during the meeting.
 
The text is a personal testimonial of praise derived from two of the great doxologies in the last book of the New Testament, which are sung in praise of the Lamb, Jesus Christ:
 
You are worthy. . .
because you were slain,
and with your blood you purchased men for God
from every tribe and language and people and nation. . . .
Worthy is the Lamb, who was slain,
to receive power and wealth and wisdom and strength and honor and glory and praise!
-Revelation 5:9, 12
 
Presumably a tune from oral tradition, DIGNO ES JESÚS has a dignified choral harmonization that suggests part singing. Try using guitar accompaniment (it could be accompanied with only three chords: F, B-flat, and C). The stanza-refrain character of the text could be emphasized by singing the stanza line in unison and the refrain line in harmony. Sing at a tempo that encourages meditative singing and do not rush.
— Bert Polman
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