869

Here I Am, Lord

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

This text uses powerful contrasting imagery of darkness and light (st. 1), turning “hearts of stone” to “love alone” (st. 2), and “setting a feast” for the “poor and lame” (st. 3). The stanzas call to us in God’s voice; the refrain is our humble response, echoing both young Samuel and the prophet Isaiah.

 

Sing!  A New Creation

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

God’s grace grants our baptism, and gives us our identity and our calling; however, it is up to us, with a renewed spirit, to respond to his call. We understand that just as “God reminds and assures us of our union with Christ in covenant love,” he also is “expecting our love and trust in return” (Our World Belong to God, paragraph 37). 

 

“We hear the Spirit’s call to love one another…to accept one another and to share at every level…and so fulfill the love of Christ” (Song of Hope, stanza 12). As washed and sanctified people, God’s children are called to “more and more [we] become dead to sin and live holy and blameless lives,” (Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 26, Question and Answer 70) and this means “the dying away of the old-self, and the rising-to-life of the new” (Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 33, Question and Answer 88). And so, as part of our baptism, God’s children are called to offer their lives to Christ. 

869

Here I Am, Lord

Additional Prayers

Optional prayer of blessing for commissioning
God of all grace,
we bless and thank you for the call
you have given to your servant(s) [names].
We bless and thank you for
prompting of your Spirit
which equips them to respond in faith.
Continue to pour out your Spirit upon them.
Bring forth in and through them the fruit of
love, joy, and peace; patience, kindness, and
goodness; faithfulness, gentleness,
and self-control.
May this harvest of righteousness
be multiplied
in every ministry,
every prayer,
every opportunity
for service to which you lead them.
In Jesus name, Amen.
— Lift Up Your Hearts (http://www.liftupyourheartshymnal.org)
869

Here I Am, Lord

Tune Information

Name
HERE I AM, LORD
Key
G Major
Meter
7.7.7.4 D refrain 8.9.8.9

Recordings

869

Here I Am, Lord

Hymn Story/Background

The text uses powerful contrasting imagery of darkness and light (st. 1), turning “hearts of stone” to “love alone” (st. 2), and “setting a feast” for the “poor and lame. (st. 3).  The stanzas call to us in God’s voice; the refrain is our humble response, echoing both young Samuel and the prophet Isaiah.  This most widely-sung of the many worship songs by Dan Schutte was written with a short deadline for a special Mass; he found it surprising that “God has taken this child of mine [the song] and made it special for a great deal of people.”  

Composer Information

John Weissrock is an award-winning organist based out of Milwaukee. He began playing the organ at age 10, and gave his first concert just two years laters. He graduated with a masters in music and an organ major from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. At age 21, he won the National Organ Competion. He has since played in Notre Dame, Paris, St. Peter’s Cathedral in Angouleme, France, and at the St. Ignatius Cathedral in Rome. Weissrock is currently the organist and director of music for Gesu Parish in Milwaukee.
— Laura de Jong

Author and Composer Information

A native of Milwaukee now living in San Francisco, Dan Schutte (b. 1947) has been composing music for thirty years. He was one of the founding members of what came to be known as the St. Louis Jesuits, a group of young Jesuit scholars encouraged by the liturgical reforms initiated by Vatican II; they released nine collections from the 1970’s to the mid-80s that were influential in encouraging a more popular style of music for Roman Catholic worship; they also released a much celebrated 30-year anniversary collection in 2005. 
— Emily Brink
Hymnary.org does not have a score for this hymn.
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