938

My Friends, May You Grow in Grace

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

This short text is an amazingly potent combination of horizontal and vertical relational elements. The first half of the song is a communal exhortation for mutual growth in the things of God. The next move is to place the community within its proper context: that is, it exists for the glory of God!

 

Sing!  A New Creation

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

According to the confessions, Christian worshipers are called to continue in service. Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 12, Question and Answer 32 instructs us to think of ourselves as “a member of Christ…[who] share in his anointing.” So we profess “I am anointed to confess his name, to present myself to him as a living sacrifice of thanks, to strive with a free conscience against sin and the devil in this life, and afterward to reign with Christ over all creation for eternity.” We serve him with good works, “…so that with our whole lives we may show that we are thankful to God for his benefits, so that he may be praised through us, so that we may be assured of our faith by its fruits, and so that by our godly living our neighbors may be won over to Christ” (Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 32, Question and Answer 86). And so we are moved to “…embrace God’s mission in [our] neighborhoods and in the world...” (Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 41). Christians, therefore, leave worship believing that “to follow this Lord is to serve him wherever we are without fitting in, light in darkness, salt in a spoiling world” (Our World Belongs to God paragraph 43).

938

My Friends, May You Grow in Grace

Additional Prayers

An Acclamation
 
God caused light to shine out of darkness.
To God be the glory.
God has shone in our hearts.
To God be the glory, now and forever.
God has shone in the face of Jesus Christ.
To God be the glory, now and forever. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
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My Friends, May You Grow in Grace

Hymn Story/Background

This song, originally written by Sean Dimond and Timothy James Meany, came into Reformed circles rather organically . It was learned – and adapted, as often happens in such learnings – by a Calvin College (Grand Rapids, Michigan) student who heard it in Seattle, Washington. It was adapted into its present form by two Calvin students, Gregg DeMey, songwriter and pastor at Elmhurst Christian Reformed Church, Illinois, and Gregory Kett, a former pastor of Trinity Christian Reformed Church in Broomal, Pennsylvania. Over time it became a regular way of concluding student-led worship services at the college. Students join hands for the song, and when reaching the words “To God be the glory,” raise their hands to the sky, still joined, in symbolic incarnation of the text. 
— Ron Rienstra

Author and Composer Information

Timothy James Meaney is a singer, song writer and producer from the greater Seattle area. He's been playing guitar and singing ever since his older cousin Charlie taught him how to strum at the age of five. Tim has 13 recordings to his name, three of which are with his Christmas trio The Three Wisemen.

Tim has performed throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe, Japan, Hong Kong and the Philippines. Tim also runs Wiseman Studios in Bellevue, WA as the lead producer for hundreds of musicians worldwide.Tim has also produced music for various organizations around the world including Microsoft, Safeco, World Concern and Walt Disney Studios, including work on the animated features “Tarzan”, “A Bugs Life” and “Toy Story 2”.

Tim and his wife Tiffany have two children, TJ and Jake and live in Bellevue, Washington.
— Timothy James Meaney (http://www.timothyjamesmeaney.com/)

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