959

Glory Be to the Father

Full Text

Glory be to the Father
and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost,
as it was in the beginning
is now, and ever shall be,
world without end. Amen, amen.

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Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

The initial part of the Gloria Patri may be traced back to the Trinitarian baptismal formula recorded in Matthew 28: 19; it was probably used by early Christians as an acclamation. The second part, which begins "as it was in the beginning," was added in the fourth century as a response to the Arian heresy. Thus the text reflects the ortho­dox insistence on the consubstantiality of the Son with the Father and the eternal unity and equality of the three persons in the Trinity.

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

How can the worshiper not conclude with such acclamations! When God is the “overflowing source of all good” (Belgic Confession, Article 1) and when he has provided all the benefits of Christ’s atonement and makes them ours so that “they are more than enough to absolve us from our sins,” (Belgic Confession, Article 22) our hearts cry out to him with praise and adoration. Therefore, Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 52, Question and Answer 128 includes the ending doxology of the Lord’s Prayer and teaches that “your holy name, and not we ourselves, should receive all the praise, forever.” And so consistent with these thoughts, Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 2 exclaims, “Our World Belongs to God! God is King: Let the earth be glad! Christ is victor: His rule has begun! The Spirit is at work: Creation is renewed! Hallelujah! Praise the Lord!” And the Belhar Confession, Section 5 concludes: “Jesus is Lord. To the one and only God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, be the honor and the glory forever and ever.”
959

Glory Be to the Father

Additional Prayers

A Prayer of Acclamation
 
Self-giving God, you have lived from all eternity in Trinitarian abundance and yet made room for creatures, kindling our lives through the mediating Son and hovering Spirit. You are now famous for your generosity. It is your glory, and we now call attention to it through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
959

Glory Be to the Father

Tune Information

Name
MEINEKE
Key
G Major
959

Glory Be to the Father

Hymn Story/Background

This Gloria Patri text is usually known as the "Lesser Doxology." It is a liturgical text common to most Christian traditions and is often appended to the singing of Old Testament psalms or New Testament canticles.
 
The initial part of the Gloria Patri may be traced back to the Trinitarian baptismal formula recorded in Matthew 28:19; it was probably used by early Christians as an acclamation. The second part, which begins "as it was in the beginning," was added in the fourth century as a response to the Arian heresy. Thus the text reflects the orthodox insistence on the consubstantiality of the Son with the Father and the eternal unity and equality of the three persons in the Trinity.
 
Charles (Christoph) Meineke composed the MEINEKE chant for an "Evening Prayer" to be used at St. Paul Episcopal Church, Baltimore, where Meineke was organist. The tune was published in his collection of psalm and hymn tunes and service music for St. Paul's congregation, Music for the Church (1844).
— Bert Polman

Composer Information

Charles (Christoph) Meineke (b. Oldenburg, Germany, 1782; d. Baltimore, MD, 1850) emigrated from Germany to England in 1810, then came to the United States in 1820. He composed the MEINEKE chant for an "Evening Prayer" to be used at St. Paul Episcopal Church, Baltimore, where Meineke was organist.
— Bert Polman
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