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Edward Mote

Edward Mote
www.hymntime.com/tch
Short Name: Edward Mote
Full Name: Mote, Edward, 1797-1874
Birth Year: 1797
Death Year: 1874

Mote, Edward, was born in Upper Thames Street, London, Jan. 21, 1797. Through the preaching of the Rev. J. Hyatt, of Tottenham Court Road Chapel, he underwent a great spiritual change; and ultimately he became a Baptist minister. For the last 26 years of his life he was pastor at Horsham, Sussex, where he died Nov. 13, 1874. Mr. Mote published several small pamphlets; and also:-

Hymns of Praise. A New Selection of Gospel Hymns, combining all the Excellencies of our spiritual Poets, with many Originals. By E. Mote. London. J. Nichols, 1836. The Originals number nearly 100.

Concerning the authorship of one of these original hymns much uncertainty has existed. The hymn is:—

1. Nor earth, nor hell my soul can move. [Jesus All in All.] In 6 stanzas of 4 lines, with a refrain. Mr. Mote's explanation, communicated to the Gospel Herald, is:—
"One morning it came into my mind as I went to labour, to write an hymn on the ‘Gracious Experience of a Christian.' As I went up Holborn I had the chorus,

‘On Christ the solid Rock I stand,
All other ground is sinking sand.’

In the day I had four first verses complete, and wrote them off. On the Sabbath following I met brother King as I came out of Lisle Street Meeting . . . who informed me that his wife was very ill, and asked me to call and see her. I had an early tea, and called afterwards. He said that it was his usual custom to sing a hymn, read a portion, and engage in prayer, before he went to meeting. He looked for his hymnbook but could find it nowhere. I said, ‘I have some verses in my pocket; if he liked, we would sing them.' We did; and his wife enjoyed them so much, that after service he asked me, as a favour, to leave a copy of them for his wife. 1 went home, and by the fireside composed the last two verses, wrote the whole off, and took them to sister King. . . As these verses so met the dying woman's case, my attention to them was the more arrested, and I had a thousand printed for distribution. I sent one to the Spiritual Magazine, without my initials, which appeared some time after this. Brother Rees, of Crown Street, Soho, brought out an edition of hymns [1836], and this hymn was in it. David Denham introduced it [1837] with Rees's name, and others after... . Your inserting this brief outline may in future shield me from the charge of stealth, and be a vindication of truthfulness in my connection with the Church of God."

The form in which the hymn is usually found is:—
2. My hope is built on nothing less (st. ii.), sometimes in 4 stanzas, and at others in 5 st., and usually without the refrain. The original in the author's Hymns of Praise, 1836, is No. 465, and entitled, "The immutable Basis of a Sinner's hope." Bishop Bickersteth calls it a "grand hymn of faith." It dates circa 1834, and is in extensive use. [Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A.]

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Wikipedia Biography

Edward Mote was a pastor and hymn writer. Born in London on 21 January 1797, his parents managed a pub and often left Edward to his own devices playing in the street. Speaking of these childhood years he once said, "So ignorant was I that I did not know that there was a God." He was finally exposed to the Christian gospel and was baptized the age of 18. He was trained as a cabinet maker and worked in London for 37 years. Only in his 50's did he enter the ministry and was pastor at Rehoboth Baptist Church in Horsham, West Sussex for 26 years. He was well liked by the congregation in Horsham and they offered him the church building as a gift. Mote replied "I do not want the chapel, I only want the pulpit; and when I cease to preach Christ, then turn me out of that." He died on 13 November 18

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