Dear Friend of Hymnary,

As you know, we don't ask for money too often. But we're asking now.

So before you hit the "close" button on this box, please consider a donation to keep Hymnary going.

More than half a million people come here every month -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people who now have access to the most complete database of North American hymnody on the planet thanks to this site. But keeping all of this afloat does not come without a cost, and we have limited sources of revenue. So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do.

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by clicking the Donate button below, or you can send a check to Hymnary at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

On behalf of the entire Hymnary team,
Harry Plantinga

Again We Keep This Solemn Fast

Author (ascribed to): Gregory the Great

Gregory I., St., Pope. Surnamed The Great. Was born at Rome about A.D. 540. His family was distinguished not only for its rank and social consideration, but for its piety and good works. His father, Gordianus, said to have been the grandson of Pope Felix II. or III., was a man of senatorial rank and great wealth; whilst his mother, Silvia, and her sisters-in-law, Tarsilla and Aemiliana, attained the distinction of canonization. Gregory made the best use of his advantages in circumstances and surroundings, so far as his education went. "A saint among saints," he was considered second to none in Rome in grammar, rhetoric, and logic. In early life, before his father's death, he became a member of the Senate; and soon after he was thirty and ac… Go to person page >

Adapter: Peter J. Scagnelli

(no biographical information available about Peter J. Scagnelli.) Go to person page >

Translator: J. M. Neale

Neale, John Mason, D.D., was born in Conduit Street, London, on Jan. 24, 1818. He inherited intellectual power on both sides: his father, the Rev. Cornelius Neale, having been Senior Wrangler, Second Chancellor's Medallist, and Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, and his mother being the daughter of John Mason Good, a man of considerable learning. Both father and mother are said to have been "very pronounced Evangelicals." The father died in 1823, and the boy's early training was entirely under the direction of his mother, his deep attachment for whom is shown by the fact that, not long before his death, he wrote of her as "a mother to whom I owe more than I can express." He was educated at Sherborne Grammar School, and was afterwards… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Again we keep this solemn fast
Title: Again We Keep This Solemn Fast
Latin Title: Ex more doci mystico
Author (ascribed to): Gregory the Great
Adapter: Peter J. Scagnelli
Translator: J. M. Neale
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English
Copyright: Adapt. © Peter J. Scagnelli

Tune

ERHALT UNS, HERR


OLD HUNDREDTH

This tune is likely the work of the composer named here, but has also been attributed to others as shown in the instances list below. According to the Handbook to the Baptist Hymnal (1992), Old 100th first appeared in the Genevan Psalter, and "the first half of the tune contains phrases which may ha…

Go to tune page >


Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 10 of 10)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Catholic Book of Worship III #352
Gather (3rd ed.) #487
Gather Comprehensive #382
Gather Comprehensive, Second Edition #407
Oramos Cantando = We Pray In Song #400
Praise y Adoración: a bilingual hymnal : un himnario bilingüe #34a
Singing Our Faith: a hymnal for young Catholics #121
The New Century Hymnal #187
Worship (3rd ed.) #420
Worship (4th ed.) #474



Advertisements