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Come, my soul, and let us try

Come, my soul, and let us try

Author: Joseph Hart
Published in 41 hymnals

Representative Text

1. Come, my soul, and let us try
For a little season,
Every burden to lay by;
Come, and let us reason.
What is this that casts thee down?
Who are they that grieve you?
Speak, and let the worst be known;
Speaking may relieve you.

2. Christ by faith sometimes I see,
Then it doth relieve me;
But my sins return again
Those are they that grieve me;
Troubled like the restless sea,
Feeble, faint, and fearful:
Plunged in sins, a sore disease,
How can I be cheerful?

3. Think on what your Savior bore
In the gloomy garden,
Sweating blood from every pore,
To procure thy pardon;
See him stretched upon the wood,
Bleeding, groaning, crying!
Suffering all the wrath of God,
Groaning, gasping, dying!

Source: Songs of Zion: being a small collection of tunes, principally original; with appropriate lines, adapted to divine worship #47

Author: Joseph Hart

Hart, Joseph, was born in London in 1712. His early life is involved in obscurity. His education was fairly good; and from the testimony of his brother-in-law, and successor in the ministry in Jewin Street, the Rev. John Hughes, "his civil calling was" for some time "that of a teacher of the learned languages." His early life, according to his own Experience which he prefaced to his Hymns, was a curious mixture of loose conduct, serious conviction of sin, and endeavours after amendment of life, and not until Whitsuntide, 1757, did he realize a permanent change, which was brought about mainly through his attending divine service at the Moravian Chapel, in Fetter Lane, London, and hearing a sermon on Rev. iii. 10. During the next two years ma… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Come, my soul, and let us try
Author: Joseph Hart
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)

The Sacred Harp #448b

Include 40 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



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