Come Thou now, and be among us

Representative Text

1 Come Thou now, and be among us,
Lord and Maker, while we pray:
Let Thy presence fill the temple
Which we dedicate to-day;
And, Thyself its Consecrator,
Dwell within its walls alway.

2 Grant that all Thy faithful people
May Thy truer temple be;
Neither flesh, nor soul, nor spirit,
Know another Lord than Thee;
But, to Thee once dedicated,
Serve Thee everlastingly.

3 Bright be here the Monarch's altar,
With the presents that we bring;
Held in holy veneration,
Rich with many an offering;
Ever hallowed, ever quiet,
Ever dear to God its King.

4 Here our souls, as Thy true altars,
Deign to hallow and to bless,
O Thou future Judge of all men,
With Thy grace and holiness:
That Thy gifts sent down from heaven,
We may evermore possess.

5 Praise and honor to the Father;
Praise and honor to the Son;
Praise and honor to the Spirit;
Ever Three, and ever One;
Consubstantial, Co-eternal,
While unending ages run.

Amen.

Source: Common Service Book of the Lutheran Church #242

Translator: J. M. Neale

John M. Neale's life is a study in contrasts: born into an evangelical home, he had sympathies toward Rome; in perpetual ill health, he was incredibly productive; of scholarly tem­perament, he devoted much time to improving social conditions in his area; often ignored or despised by his contemporaries, he is lauded today for his contributions to the church and hymnody. Neale's gifts came to expression early–he won the Seatonian prize for religious poetry eleven times while a student at Trinity College, Cambridge, England. He was ordained in the Church of England in 1842, but ill health and his strong support of the Oxford Movement kept him from ordinary parish ministry. So Neale spent the years between 1846 and 1866 as a warden of Sackvi… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Come Thou now, and be among us
Latin Title: Urbs beata Hierusalem
Translator: J. M. Neale
Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.7
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

REGENT SQUARE (Smart)

Henry T. Smart (PHH 233) composed REGENT SQUARE for the Horatius Bonar (PHH 260) doxology "Glory be to God the Father." The tune was first published in the English Presbyterian Church's Psalms and Hymns for Divine Worship (1867), of which Smart was music editor. Because the text editor of that hymna…

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ST. PANCRAS (Smart)


SICILIAN MARINERS

SICILIAN MARINERS is traditionally used for the Roman Catholic Marian hymn "O Sanctissima." According to tradition, Sicilian seamen ended each day on their ships by singing this hymn in unison. The tune probably traveled from Italy to Germany to England, where The European Magazine and London Review…

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Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 12 of 12)
Page Scan

A Selection of Hymns #262

TextPage Scan

Book of Worship (Rev. ed.) #491

TextPage Scan

Book of Worship with Hymns and Tunes #295

Page Scan

Church Book #293

TextPage Scan

Church Book #293

TextPage Scan

Common Service Book of the Lutheran Church #242

Gloria in Excelsis #d117

Page Scan

Hymns for the use of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, by the Authority of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania #292

Page Scan

The Book of Worship #282

Page Scan

The Church and Sunday-School Hymnal #161

The Hymns for the Use of Evangelical Lutheran Congregations #d79

TextPage Scan

The Lutheran Hymnary #131

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