Here behold me as I cast me

Representative Text

1 Here behold me, as I cast me
'Neath Thy throne, O glorious King!
Sorrows thronging, child-like longing,
Son of Man, to Thee I bring.
Let me find Thee!
Let me find Thee!
Me, a poor and worthless thing.

2 Look upon me, Lord, I pray Thee,
Let Thy Spirit dwell in mine;
Thou hast sought me, Thou hast bought me,
Only Thee to know I pine.
Let me find Thee!
Let me find Thee!
Take my heart, and own me Thine!

3 Naught I ask for, naught I strive for,
But Thy grace, so rich and free,
That Thou givest whom Thou lovest,
And who truly cleave to Thee.
Let me find Thee!
Let me find Thee!
He hath all things who hath Thee.

Amen.

Source: The Hymnal and Order of Service #352

Author: Joachim Neander

Neander, Joachim, was born at Bremen, in 1650, as the eldest child of the marriage of Johann Joachim Neander and Catharina Knipping, which took place on Sept. 18, 1649, the father being then master of the Third Form in the Paedagogium at Bremen. The family name was originally Neumann (Newman) or Niemann, but the grandfather of the poet had assumed the Greek form of the name, i.e. Neander. After passing through the Paedagogium he entered himself as a student at the Gymnasium illustre (Academic Gymnasium) of Bremen in Oct. 1666. German student life in the 17th century was anything but refined, and Neander seems to have been as riotous and as fond of questionable pleasures as most of his fellows. In July 1670, Theodore Under-Eyck came to Breme… Go to person page >

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth (b. Holborn, London, England, 1827; d. Monnetier, Savoy, France, 1878) is well known for her English translations of German hymns; her translations were polished and yet remained close to the original. Educated initially by her mother, she lived with relatives in Dresden, Germany, in 1845, where she acquired her knowledge of German and interest in German hymnody. After residing near Manchester until 1862, she moved to Clifton, near Bristol. A pioneer in promoting women's rights, Winkworth put much of her energy into the encouragement of higher education for women. She translated a large number of German hymn texts from hymnals owned by a friend, Baron Bunsen. Though often altered, these translations continue to be used i… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Here behold me as I cast me
German Title: Sieh hier bin ich, Ehrenkönig
Author: Joachim Neander (1679)
Translator: Catherine Winkworth (1863)
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 20 of 20)
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Chorale Book for England, The #122

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Church Book #23

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Church Book #23

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Common Service Book of the Lutheran Church #273

Hymnal for Church, School and Home #d48

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Hymns for the use of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, by the Authority of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania #21

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Songs of the Soul #282

The Annex #d35

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The Book of Worship #26

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The Christian Hymn Book #891

The Christian Hymnal #d258

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The Christian Hymnal #656

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The Christian hymnal #527

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The Hymnal and Order of Service #352

Text

The Hymnal and Order of Service #352

The Hymnal of the Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod. Text ed. #d186

The Hymns for the Use of Evangelical Lutheran Congregations #d159

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The Lutheran Hymnary #276

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Wartburg Hymnal #307

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Worship in Song #427

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