Let saints on earth in concert sing

Representative Text

1 Let saints on earth in concert sing
with those whose work is done;
for all the servants of our King
in heaven and earth are one.

2 One family, we dwell in him,
one church, above, beneath;
though now divided by the stream,
the narrow stream of death.

3 One army of the living God,
to his command we bow:
part of the host have crossed the flood,
and part are crossing now.

4 E'en now to their eternal home
there pass some spirits blest;
while others to the margin come,
waiting their call to rest.

5 Jesu, be thou our constant guide;
then, when the word is given,
bid Jordan's narrow stream divide,
and bring us safe to heaven.

Source: Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #304

Author: Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepene… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Let saints below in concert sing
Title: Let saints on earth in concert sing
Author: Charles Wesley (1759)
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Source: Funeral Hymns, 1759
Language: English
Notes: These words are derived from Wesley's "Come, Let Us Join Our Friends Above."
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

DUNDEE (Ravenscroft)

DUNDEE first appeared in the 1615 edition of the Scottish Psalter published in Edinburgh by Andro Hart. Called a "French" tune (thus it also goes by the name of FRENCH), DUNDEE was one of that hymnal's twelve "common tunes"; that is, it was not associated with a specific psalm. In the Psalter Hymnal…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #4025
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 16 of 16)
Text

Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #304

Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #428

TextPage Scan

Common Praise (1998) #282

Page Scan

Common Praise: A new edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern #222

TextPage Scan

Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #384

Complete Mission Praise #409

TextPage Scan

Hymnal 1982: according to the use of the Episcopal Church #526

Hymns Ancient & Modern, New Standard Edition #182

Text

Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #574

Hymns Old and New: New Anglican #297

TextPage Scan

Rejoice in the Lord #572

Sing Glory: Hymns, Psalms and Songs for a New Century #578

The Covenant Hymnal: a worshipbook #766

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #4025

TextPage Scan

The New English Hymnal #396

TextPage Scan

Worship (3rd ed.) #741

Include 144 pre-1979 instances
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