Praise and thanks to Thee be sung

Representative Text

Praise and thanks to Thee be sung,
Mighty God, in sweetest tone!
Lo! from ev'ry land and tongue
Nations gather round Thy throne,
Praising Thee that Thou dost send,
Daily from Thy heav'n above,
Angel-messengers of love,
Who Thy threaten'd Church defend.
Who can offer worthily,
Lord of angels, praise to Thee!

'T is your office, Spirits bright,
Still to guard us night and day,
And before your heavenly might
Powers of darkness flee away;
Ever doth your unseen host
Camp around us, and avert
All that feeks to do us hurt,
Curbing Satan's malice most.
Lord, who then can worthily
For such goodness honour Thee!

And ye come on ready wing,
When we drift toward sheer despair,
Seeing nought where we might cling,
Suddenly, lo, ye are there!
And the wearied heart grows strong,
As an angel strengthen'd Him,
Fainting in the garden dim
'Neath the world's vast woe and wrong.
Lord, who then can worthily
For such mercy honour Thee!

Right and seemly is it then
We should glory, that our God
Hath such honour put on men,
That He sends o'er earth abroad
Princes of the realm above,
Champions, who by day and night
Shield us with His holy might;
Come, behold how great His love!
Lord, who then can worthily
For such favour honour Thee!

Praise and thanks to Thee be sung,
Mighty God, in sweetest tone!
Lo! from ev'ry land and tongue
Nations gather round Thy throne,
Praising Thee that Thou dost send,
Hourly from Thy glorious sphere,
Angels down to help us here,
And Thy threaten'd Church defend.
Let us henceforth worthily,
Lord of angels, honour Thee.



Source: Chorale Book for England, The #85

Author: Johann von Rist

Rist, Johann, son of Kaspar Rist, pastor at Ottensen, near Hamburg, was born at Ottensen, March 8, 1607, and from his birth was dedicated to the ministry. After passing through the Johanneum at Hamburg and the Gymnasium Illustre at Bremen, he matriculated, in his 21st year, at the University of Rinteln, and there, under Josua Stegmann (q. v.), he received an impulse to hymn-writing. On leaving Rinteln he acted as tutor to the sons of a Hamburg merchant, accompanying them to the University of Rostock, where he himself studied Hebrew, Mathematics and also Medicine. During his residence at Rostock the terrors, of the Thirty Years War almost emptied the University, and Rist himself also lay there for weeks ill of the pestilence. After his r… Go to person page >

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth (b. Holborn, London, England, 1827; d. Monnetier, Savoy, France, 1878) is well known for her English translations of German hymns; her translations were polished and yet remained close to the original. Educated initially by her mother, she lived with relatives in Dresden, Germany, in 1845, where she acquired her knowledge of German and interest in German hymnody. After residing near Manchester until 1862, she moved to Clifton, near Bristol. A pioneer in promoting women's rights, Winkworth put much of her energy into the encouragement of higher education for women. She translated a large number of German hymn texts from hymnals owned by a friend, Baron Bunsen. Though often altered, these translations continue to be used i… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Praise and thanks to Thee be sung
German Title: Ehr und Dank sei dir gesungen
Author: Johann von Rist (1655)
Translator: Catherine Winkworth (1855)
Meter: 7.7.7.7.7.7.7.7.7.7
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

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Instances (1 - 3 of 3)
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Chorale Book for England, The #85

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Lyra Germanica #205

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Lyra Germanica #83

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