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Thy way, O God, is in the sea

Thy way, O God, is in the sea

Author: John Fawcett
Published in 132 hymnals

Full Text

1 Thy way, O God, is in the sea;
Thy paths I cannot trace,
Nor comprehend the mystery
Of Thine unbounded grace.

2 Here the dark veils of flesh and sense
My captive soul surround;
Mysterious deeps of providence
My wondering thoughts confound.

3 As through a glass, I dimly see
The wonders of Thy love,
How little do I know of Thee,
Or of the joys above!

4 'Tis but in part I know Thy will:
I bless Thee for the sight;
When will Thy Love the rest reveal
In glory's clearer light?

5 With raptures shall I then survey
Thy providence and grace;
And spend an everlasting day
In wonder, love and praise.

Amen.

Source: Book of Worship with Hymns and Tunes #478

Author: John Fawcett

Fawcett, John, D.D., was born Jan. 6, 1739 or 1740, at Lidget Green, near Bradford, Yorks. Converted at the age of sixteen under the ministry of G. Whitefield, he at first joined the Methodists, but three years later united with the Baptist Church at Bradford. Having begun to preach he was, in 1765, ordained Baptist minister at Wainsgate, near Hebden Bridge, Yorks. In 1772 he was invited to London, to succeed the celebrated Dr. J. Gill, as pastor of Carter's Lane; the invitation had been formally accepted, the farewell sermon at Wainsgate had been preached and the wagons loaded with his goods for removal, when the love and tears of his attached people prevailed and he decided to remain. In 1777 a new chapel was built for him at Hebden Bridg… Go to person page >

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