Well for him who all things losing

Representative Text

1 Well for him who all things losing,
Even himself doth count as naught,
Still the one thing needful choosing,
That with all true bliss is fraught!

2 Well for him who all forsaking,
Walketh not in shadows vain,
But the path of peace is taking
Through this vale of tears and pain!

3 O that we our hearts might sever
From earth's tempting vanities,
Fixing them on Him for ever,
In whom all our fulness lies!

4 O that ne'er our eyes might wander
From our God: so might we cease
Ever o'er our sins to ponder,
And our conscience be at peace!

5 Thou Abyss of love and goodness,
Draw us by Thy Cross to Thee,
That our senses, soul and spirit,
Ever one with Christ may be!

Source: Church Book: for the use of Evangelical Lutheran congregations #451

Author: Gottfried Arnold

Arnold, Gottfried, son of Gottfried Arnold, sixth master of the Town School of Annaberg in the Saxon Harz, born at Annaberg Sept. 5, 1666. His life was varied and eventful, and although much of it had little to do with hymnody from an English point of view, yet his position in German Hymnology is such as to necessitate an extended notice, which, through pressure of space, must be (typographically) compressed. After passing through the Town School and the Gymnasium at Gera, he matriculated in 1685 at the University of Wittenberg—where he found the strictest Lutheran orthodoxy in doctrine combined with the loosest of living. Preserved by his enthusiasm for study from the grosser vices of his fellows, turning to contemplate the lives of t… Go to person page >

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth is "the most gifted translator of any foreign sacred lyrics into our tongue, after Dr. Neale and John Wesley; and in practical services rendered, taking quality with quantity, the first of those who have laboured upon German hymns. Our knowledge of them is due to her more largely than to any or all other translators; and by her two series of Lyra Germanica, her Chorale Book, and her Christian Singers of Germany, she has laid all English-speaking Christians under lasting obligation." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Well for him who all things losing
German Title: O der alles hält' verloren
Author: Gottfried Arnold
Translator: Catherine Winkworth (1855)
Meter: 9.8.9.8
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

RATHBUN

This story is associated with the writing of RATHBUN: One Sunday in 1849 Ithamar Conkey (b. Shutesbury, MA, 1815; d. Elizabeth, NJ, 1867) walked out of the morning service at Central Baptist Church, Norwich, Connecticut, where he was choir director and organist, frustrated because only one soprano f…

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COURAGE (Davies)


ST. ANDREW (Macfarren)


Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 19 of 19)
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Chorale Book for England, The #132

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Christian Science Hymnal #115

Christian Science Hymnal #379

Tune Info

Christian Science Hymnal #380

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Christian Science Hymnal: a selection of spiritual songs #115a

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Christian Science Hymnal: a selection of spiritual songs #115b

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Christian Science Hymnal: a selection of spiritual songs #115c

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Christian Science Hymnal: a selection of spiritual songs #115

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Church Book: for the use of Evangelical Lutheran congregations #451

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Church Book: for the use of Evangelical Lutheran congregations #451

Hymn Service No.3 #d96

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Hymnal of the Methodist Episcopal Church #492

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Hymnal of the Methodist Episcopal Church #492

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Hymnal of the Presbyterian Church #455

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Hymns for the use of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, by the Authority of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania #481

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Lyra Germanica: hymns for the Sundays and chief festivals of the Christian year #134

Text

Lyra Germanica: The Christian Year #57

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Song-Hymnal of Praise and Joy, a selection of spiritual songs, old and new #274

The Advent Christian Hymnal #d969

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