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What within me and without

Full Text

What within me and without,
Hourly on my spirit weighs,
Burd'ning heart and soul with doubt,
Dark'ning all my weary days:
In it I behold Thy will,
God, who givest rest and peace,
And my heart is calm and still,
Waiting till Thou send release.

God! Thou art my rock of strength,
And my home is in Thine arms,
Thou wilt send me help at length,
And I feel no wild alarms.
Sin nor Death can pierce the shield
Thy defence has o'er me thrown,
Up to Thee myself I yield,
And my sorrows are Thine own.

Thou my shelter from the blast,
Thou my strong defence art ever;
Though my sorrows thicken fast,
Yet I know Thou leav'st me never;
When my foe puts forth his might,
And would tread me in the dust,
To this rock I take my flight,
And I conquer him through trust.

When my trials tarry long,
Unto Thee I look and wait,
Knowing none, though keen and strong,
Can my faith in Thee abate,
And this faith I long have nurst,
Comes alone, O God, from Thee;
Thou my heart didst open first,
Thou didst set this hope in me.

Christians! cast on Him your load,
To your tower of refuge fly!
Know He is the Living God,
Ever to His creatures nigh.
Seek His ever-open door
In your hours of utmost need;
All your hearts before Him pour,
He will send you help with speed.

But hast thou some darling plan,
Cleaving to the things of earth?
Leanest thou for aid on man?
Thou wilt find him nothing worth.
Rather trust the One alone
Whose is endless power and love,
And the help He gives His own
Thou in very deed shalt prove.

Yea, on Thee, my God, I rest,
Letting life float calmly on,
For I know the last is best,
When the crown of joy is won.
In Thy might all things I bear,
In Thy love find bitters sweet,
And with all my grief and care
Sit in patience at Thy feet.

O my soul, why art thou vex'd?
Let things go as e'en they will;
Though to thee they seem perplex'd,
Yet His order they fulfil.
Here He is Thy strength and guard,
Power to harm thee here has none;
Yonder will He each reward
For the works he here has done.

Let Thy mercy's wings be spread
O'er me, keep me close to Thee,
In the peace Thy love doth shed,
Let me dwell eternally;
Be my All; in all I do
Let me only seek Thy will,
Where the heart to Thee is true,
All is peaceful, calm, and still.



Source: Chorale Book for England, The #139

Author: August Hermann Francke

Francke, August Hermann, son of Johann Francke, a lawyer in Lubeck, was born at Lubeck, March 22, 1663. He studied at the Universities of Erfurt, Kiel, and Leipzig, graduated M.A. at Leipzig, 1685, and thereafter lectured on Biblical subjects at Leipzig for some time. About Michaelmas, 1687, he went to Lüneburg to work under the pious superintendent C. H. Sandhagen; and there while composing his first sermon (on St. John xx. 31) he underwent that change which made him call Lüneburg his spiritual birthplace. After spending the greater part of 1688 at Hamburg, he stayed two months with P. J. Spener at Dresden, and then returned about Lent, 1689, to Leipzig, where he resumed his Biblical lectures until the old orthodox party procured an edic… Go to person page >

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth is "the most gifted translator of any foreign sacred lyrics into our tongue, after Dr. Neale and John Wesley; and in practical services rendered, taking quality with quantity, the first of those who have laboured upon German hymns. Our knowledge of them is due to her more largely than to any or all other translators; and by her two series of Lyra Germanica, her Chorale Book, and her Christian Singers of Germany, she has laid all English-speaking Christians under lasting obligation." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: What within me and without
German Title: Was von aussen und von innen
Translator: Catherine Winkworth (1855)
Author: August Hermann Francke
Meter: 7.7.7.7
Language: English

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #10694
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
The Cyber Hymnal #10694TextScoreAudio
Include 6 pre-1979 instances



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