You May Know Where to Find Me

You may know where to find me when there's work to do

Author: William C. Poole
Tune: ALOHA OE
Published in 1 hymnal

Representative Text

1 You may know where to find me when there’s work to do—
In the field where the Lord has need of me;
Where the harvest is waiting with the reapers true,
Ever loyal and faithful will I be.

Refrain:
Where He may need me, there I’ll be,
And from my lips a song of praise shall ring;
I’ve answered, “Master, here am I!”
And have surrendered wholly to my King.

2 You may know where to find me when the fight is on—
In the front of the battle for the right;
You may know where to find me till the vict’ry’s won—
At the front, in the thickest of the fight. [Refrain]

3 You may know where to find me when the Lord shall call
All His own to a blessed home above;
You may look for me yonder where the Lord o’er all
Is forever the reigning King of love. [Refrain]

Source: Progressive Sunday School Songs #19

Author: William C. Poole

William C. Poole was born and raised on a farm in Maryland. His parents belonged to the Methodist church. He graduated from Washington College and became a Methodist minister in Wilmington, Delaware area. He was pastor of McCabe Memorial, Richardson Park and other churches. In 1913 he was superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League of Delaware. He wrote about five hundred hymns. The writing was done as recreation and a diversion from his pastoral work. His goal in writing as well as in being a minister was to help people. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: You may know where to find me when there's work to do
Title: You May Know Where to Find Me
Author: William C. Poole
Refrain First Line: Where he may need me

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextPage Scan

Progressive Sunday School Songs #19

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