John Greenleaf Whittier

John Greenleaf Whittier
www.hymntime.com
Short Name: John Greenleaf Whittier
Full Name: Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1807-1892
Birth Year: 1807
Death Year: 1892

Whittier, John Greenleaf, the American Quaker poet, was born at Haverhill, Massachusetts, Dec. 17, 1807. He began life as a farm-boy and shoemaker, and subsequently became a successful journalist, editor and poet. In 1828 he became editor of the American Manufacturer (Boston), in 1830 of the New England Review, and an 1836 (on becoming Secretary to the American Anti-Slavery Society) of the Pennsylvania Freeman. He was also for some time, beginning with 1847, the corresponding editor of the National Era. In 1840 he removed to Amesbury, Massachusetts, where most of his later works have been written. At the present time [1890] he lives alternately at Amesbury and Boston. His first poetical piece was printed in the Newburyport Free Press in 1824. Since then his publications have been numerous, including:—
Voices of Freedom, 1833; Songs of Labour, and other Poems, 1850; Ballads and other Poems, London, 1844; The Panorama, and other Poems, 1856; In War Time, 1863; Occasional Poems, 1865; Poetical Works, 1869; Complete Poetical Works, 1876; The Bay of the Seven Islands, and other Poems, 1883, &c.

From his numerous poems the following hymns have been compiled, and have come into common use, more especially amongst the American Unitarians:—
1. All as God wills, Who wisely heeds. Trust. This begins with stanza xi. of Whittier's poem, "My Psalm." in his workThe Panorama, and other Poems, 1856 (Complete Poetical Works, Boston, 1876, p. 179), and is given in Lyra Sacra Americana , 1868; Border's Congregational Hymns, 1884, &c.
2. All things are Thine: no gift have we. Opening of a Place of Worship. Written for the Opening of Plymouth Church, Minnesota, 1872 ( Complete Poetical Works , p. 281). In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884.
3. Another hand is beckoning us. Bereavement. From his poem " Gone," written in 1845 (Complete Poetical Works, p. 106). In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884.
4. Dear Lord and Father of mankind. Calmness in God desired. From his poem “The Brewing of Soma," beginning with stanza xii. (Complete Poetical Works p. 266). In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884.
5. God giveth quietness at last. Death and Burial. This begins with stanza xvii. of his poem, “The Singer," written in 1871 (Author's MS.), and included in the Complete Poetical Works, 1876, p. 265. In Martineau's Hymns, 1875.
6. Hast thou, 'midst life's empty noises. The Purpose of Life. Written in 1842. It is in Longfellow and Johnson's Unitarian Book of Hymns, Boston, 1846, and several other later American collections. Also in Lyra Sacra Americana, 1864.
7. I ask not now for gold to gild. Resignation. From his poem "The Wish of To-Day." Written in 1848 (Author's MS.). In Hedge and Huntingdon's Unitarian Hymns for the Church of Christ, Boston, 1853; the Laudes Domini, 1884, and other collections.
8. Immortal love, for ever full. The Love of Jesus. This poem, entitled “Our Master," appeared in Whittier's work, The Panorama, and other Poems, 1856, in 35 stanzas of 4 lines; in Schaff’s Christ in Song, 1869-70, p. 117; and in the Complete Poetical Works, 1876, p. 231, and others. From this poem the following centos have come into common use:—
(1) Immortal love for ever full. In the 1890 edition of the Hymnal Companion and others.
(2) 0 Lord and Master of us all. Begins with stanza xvi.
(3) 0 Love! O Life! our faith and sight. Begins with stanza xxiv. In several American hymnals, including the Unitarian Hymn [and Tune Book ], Boston, 1868, and others.
(4) Our Friend, our Brother, and our Lord. Begins with stanza xxxiv. In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884, &c.
(5) We faintly hear, we dimly see. Begins with stanza xxvi. In Barrett's Congregational Church Hymnal, 1887.
(6) We may not climb the heavenly steeps. Begins with stanza v. In Laudes Domini, 1884; the Primitive Methodist Hymnal, 1887, &c.

The use of these centos shows that the hymnic element in the original poem is of a high and enduring order.
9. It may not be our lot to wield. Duty and its Reward. This begins with stanza iv. of his poem "Seedtime and Harvest." Written circa 1850 (Author's MS.). Given in his Complete Poetical Works, p. 114. The hymn is in Laudes Domini, 1884, and other American collections.
10. May freedom speed onward, wherever the blood. Freedom. In the 1848 Supplement to the Boston Book of Hymns, Boston, No. 582, Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, and other collections. In Whittier's Poetical Works, Boston, 1869, p. 68, it is given as, “Right onward, O speed it! Wherever the blood”.
11. Now is the seed-time; God alone. Self-Sacrifice. In the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, No. 683.
12. 0 backward-looking son of time. New and Old. This begins with stanza xix. of his poem "The Reformer," and is given in this form in the Boston Hymns for the Church of Christ, Boston, 1853, No. 835, and again in later collections. In full in the Complete Poetical Works, p. 78.
13. 0 beauty, old yet ever new. The Law of Love. This in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, begins with stanza xxi. of his poem on “The Shadow and the Light,” given in full in the Complete Poetical Works , p. 173.
14. 0 fairest-born of love and light. American National Hymn. This is from his poem "Democracy," which is dated "Election Day, 1843," and is in his Ballads and other Poems, London, 1844, p. 214, and his Complete Poetical Works, p. 82.
15. 0, he whom Jesus loves has truly spoken. True Worship. This in the 1848 Supplement to the Boston Book of Hymns, 1848, No. 578, begins with stanza xi. of his poem on “Worship," given in full in his Complete Poetical Works, p. 96. The poem is dated by the Author, 1848 (Author's MS.).
16. 0 holy Father, just and true. Freedom. "Lines written for the Celebration of the third Anniversary of British Emancipation at the Broadway Tabernacle, N. Y., First of August, 1837." (Complete Poetical Works, p. 47.) It was included in the Unitarian Christian Hymns, Boston, 1844, and has been repeated in later collections.
17. 0 Maker of the Fruits and Flowers. Flower Services. This begins with stanza iv. of his "Lines for the Agricultural and Horticultural Exhibition at Amesbury and Salisbury, Sep. 28, 1858," as given in his Complete Poetical Works , p. 183. It is in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, and as "O Painter of the fruits and flowers," in Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884.
18. O not alone with outward sign. Divine Invitation. This begins with stanza ii. of his poem, "The Call of the Christian," given in his Ballads and other Poems, London, 1844, p. 185, and his Complete Poetical Works, p. 73. The hymn appeared in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1846, and again in later collections.
19. O pure Reformers, not in vain. Freedom. This begins with stanza xii. of his poem "To the Reformers of England," as given in his Complete Poetical Works, p. 77. The hymn was included in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1846, and has been repeated in later collections.
20. O sometimes gleams upon our sight. Old and New. This is taken from his poem "The Chapel of the Hermits," 1852 (in 94 stanzas of 4 lines), and begins with stanza xi. (Comp. Poetical Works, p. 115.) The cento was given in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, and repeated in later collections.
21. O Thou, at Whose rebuke the grave. Mercy. This was given in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1848, No. 44l.
22. O [God] Thou, Whose presence went before. National Hymn. This hymn is dated by the author 1834 (Author's MS.), and was written for the Anti-slavery Meeting at Chatham Street Chapel, New York, "on the 4th of the 7th month, 1831." It is No. 750 in the Unitarian Christian Hymns, 1844. It is sometimes given as “0 God, whose presence went before."
23. 0, what though our feet may not tread where Christ trod. Presence of Christ's Spirit. The author dates this 1837 (Author's MS.). It is No. 150 in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1846. In their Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, No. 652, it begins: "0, wherefore the dream of the earthly abode." Both centos are from his poem “Poledom."
24. Shall we grow weary in our watch? Patience, or Resignation. This begins with stanza x. of his poem "The Cypress-Tree of Ceylon." (Complete Poetical Works, p. 84.) This form of the text was given in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1846, No. 278, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884, in 3 stanzas.
25. Sport of the changeful multitude. Persecution. This begins with line 6 of stanza x. of his poem "Ezekiel," and was given in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, No. 65lines In full in Complete Poetical Works, p. 67.
26. The green earth sends its incense up. Worship of Nature. The author dates this 1845 (Author's MS.). It is from his poem “The Worship of Nature," and was given in this form in the Boston Hymns for the Church of Christ, 1853, No. 193. The cento "The harp at Nature's advent strung," in the Unitarian Hymn [and Tune] Book, Boston, 1868, No. 195, is from the same poem. The cento No. 321 in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, is also (altered) from this poem.
27. The path of life we walk today. The Shadowing Rock. This in the Boston Hys. of the Spirit, 1864, begins with stanza i. of his poem on "The Rock in El Gh'or," which the author dates 1859 (Author's MS.). In full in Complete Poetical Works, p. 180.
28. Thine are all the gifts, 0 God. Children's Missions, or Ragged Schools. Written for the Anniversary of the Children's Mission, Boston, 1878. It is given in Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884.
29. Thou hast fallen in thine armour. Death. From his poem "To the memory of Charles B. Storrs, late President of Western Reserve College," published in his Ballads and other Poems, London, 1844, p. 84. Dated by the author 1835 (Author's MS.). Abridged form in the Hymns of the Spirit, 1864.
30. To-day, beneath Thy chastening eye. Seeking Rest. This begins with stanza iv. of his poem, "The Wish of To-Day," dated by the author 1847 (Author's MS.), and given in full in his Complete Poetical Works, p. 114. The cento is in Martineau's Hymns, 1873, and others.
31. We see not, know not; all our way. Resignation. "Written at the opening of the Civil War, 1861" (Author's MS.), and included in his In War Time, 1863, and his Complete Poetical Works, p. 190. In full in the Prim. Methodist Hymnal, 1887.
32. When on my day of life the night is falling. Old Age. Written in 1882 (Author's MS.), and included in his work The Bay of the Seven Islands, and other Poems, 1883. In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884.
33. With silence only as their benediction. Death. 1845. "Written on the death of Sophia Sturge, sister of Joseph Sturge, of Birmingham, England" (Author's MS.). It is in several collections, including Martineau's Hymns, &c, 1873; Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884, and others.

Notwithstanding this extensive use of portions of Mr. Whittier's poems as hymns for congregational use, he modestly says concerning himself: "I am really not a hymn-writer, for the good reason that I know nothing of music. Only a very few of my pieces were written for singing. A good hymn is the best use to which poetry can be devoted, but I do not claim that I have succeeded in composing one." (Author's MS.) We must add, however, that these pieces are characterized by rich poetic beauty, sweet tenderness, and deep sympathy with human kind.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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Whittier, J. G, p. 1277, i. In addition to the large number of this author's hymns already annotated from his own manuscript, the following have also come into use, mainly in the form of centos from his poems, during the past ten years:—
i. From Poems, 1850:—
1. O brother man! Fold to thy heart thy brother. [Brotherly Love.] From his poem, “Worship." Written in 1848, and published in Poems, 1850.
ii. From Songs of Labour, and Other Poems, 1850;—
2. Bowed down in lowliness of min. [Resignation.] From the poem “The Wish of To-day."
iii. From The Chapel of the Hermits, and Other Poems, 1853:—
3. O, sometimes glimpses on our sight. [Light in Darkness.] First published in The National Era, 1851, and again as above, 1853. In The Pilgrim Hymnal, N.Y. 1904, it begins " 0 sometimes gleams upon our sight," and in Hymns of the Ages, 1904, "Yet sometimes glimpses on my sight"; see p. 1277, ii. 20.
iv. From The Panorama, and Other Poems, 1856:—
4. Thou, 0 most compassionate. [Divine Compassion.] This cento is from the poem "My Dream," and is dated 1855.
v. From Home Ballads and Poems, 1860:—
5. I mourn no more my vanished years. [Life's Review.] A cento from "My Psalm," dated 1859, opening with st. i.
6. No longer forward nor behind. This begins with st. iii. of "My Psalm."
7. O hearts of love, O souls that turn. [Life from, Christ.] A cento from the poem, "The Overheart."
8. O Love Divine, Whose constant beam. [Divine Love Universal.] From the poem, "The Shadow and the Light." The form in which it is given in The Pilgrim Hymnal, 1904, first appeared in The Independent, Nov. 1860.
9. Once more the liberal year laughs out. [Autumn.] From his "For an Autumn Festival," 1859.
vi. From In War Time, and Other Poems, 1864:—
10. I can only urge the plea. [Cry for Mercy.] A cento from “Andrew Rykman’s Prayer,” dated 1863.
11. What Thou wilt, O Father, give. Also from “Andrew Kykman's Prayer."
vii. From The Tent on the Beach, and Other Poems, 1867:—
12. I bow my forehead to [in] the dust. St. ix., &c.
13. I know not what the future hath. St. xvi., &c.
14. I long for household voices gone. St. xv., &c.
15. I see the wrong that round me lies. St. x., &c.
16. Who fathoms the Eternal Thought. St. iv., &c.
17. Yet, in the maddening maze of things. St. xi., &c.
These centos are taken from the poem, "The Eternal Goodness," which is dated 1865.
viii. From Among the Hills, and Other Poems, 1869:—
18. For ever round the mercy-seat. [God's Love and Man's Unfaithfulness.] From the poem, “The Answer."
ix. From The Pennsylvania Pilgrim, and Other Poems, 1873:—
19. Best for the weary hands is good. [Daily Renewal.] This is from "My Birthday," which appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, 1871, and again as above, 1873.
x. From Hazel Blossoms, 1875:—
20. All things [gifts] are Thine, p. 1277, i. 2. The church for which this was written, in 1873, was Plymouth Church, St. Paul, Minn. The hymn was included in Hazel Blossoms, 1875.
21. We need love's tender lessons taught. [Love.] From Child-Songs," in Hazel Blossoms, opening with st. ix.
xi. From The Bay of the Seven Islands, 1883:—
22. As from the lighted hearths behind me. [Anticipation of the Future.] This begins with st. iii. of the poem, "What the Traveller said at Sunset."
xii. Additional Notes:—
23. Lord, for the things we see. [Public Gatherings.] This hymn is from "Poledom," 1837.
24. Not always as the whirlwind's rush. [Call to the Ministry.] Published in The Poetical Writings, 1857, Vol. i., p. 254, and again in the Oxford edition of his Poetical Works, 1904, p. 455. It is dated 1833.
25. Sound over all waters, [The Coming Kingdom.)
This, in Horder's Worship Song, 1905, is from Whittier's Complete Poetical Works, Boston, 1876, p. 280, where it is dated 1873.
26. Take courage, Temperance workers. [Temperance.] Mr. Pickard, Whittier's literary executor, cannot trace this hymn in any of the author's writings, and we also are at fault.
27. The harp at Nature's advent strung. [Nature's acknowledgement of God.] Dr. Charles L. Noyes, one of the editors of The Pilgrim Hymnal, 1904, writes us concerning this hymn: "It was first published in its present form [as in the American hymn-books] in 1867 in The Tent on the Beach." But a hymn almost identical was written when Whittier was in his teens, and published in the Haverhill Gazette, October 5, 1827. The same poem appeared in The Palladium, 1829. It was revised for The Tent on the Beach, 1867 (p. 1278, i. 26).
28. We see not, know not; all our way, p. 1278, i. 31. This hymn, written in 1861, first appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, 1862, vol. 10, p. 235.
29. Wherever through the ages rise. [Love is universal.] Opens with line 1 of a section in the poem "Miriam," in Miriam, and Other Poems, 1871, p. 13.
30. Who calls Thy glorious service hard? [Duty.] This begins with st. iii. of his poem "Seedtime and Harvest," noted on p. 1277, ii. 9.
31. O Lord and Father of mankind. This is a slightly altered form of "Dear Lord and Father of mankind." p. 1277, i. 4.
The poem, “Our Master," stated on p. 1277, i., No. 8, as having appeared in The Panorama, 1856, in error, was given in The Tent on the Beach, and Other Poems, Boston, 1867, pp. 143-152.
In compiling the foregoing, we have been materially assisted by Mr. Pickard, the poet's literary executor, and the Rev. Dr. Charles L. Noyes, of Somerville, Mass. Whittier died at Hampton Falls, New Hampshire, Sep. 7, 1892.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

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Texts by John Greenleaf Whittier (177)sort descendingAsAuthority LanguagesInstances
A dreary place would be this earthJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
A picture memory bringsJ. G. Whittier (Author)2
A tender child of summers threeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
All as God wills, who wisely heeds John G. Whittier (Author)74
All things are thine; no gift have weJohn G. Whittier (Author)English108
All through the long bright days in JuneJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
Another hand is beckoning usJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)65
Arouse, New England sons, arouseJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)4
As from the lighted hearths behind meJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
As o'er his furrowed fields which lieJohn G. Whittier (Author)9
Ayat ti Dios di mabubusJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)Tagalog2
Beneath the moonlight and the snowJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
Bland as the morning breath of JuneJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
Blest land of Judea, thrice hallowed in [of] songJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)20
Blow, winds of God, awake and blow the mistsJohn G. Whittier (Author)13
Build up an altar to the LordJohn G. Whittier (Author)6
Children of God, reach out to one another!John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892) (Author)4
Christ is his own best evidenceJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
The summer days are come againJ. G. W. (Author (stanzas 4, 5))1
Dear Lord and Father of mankindJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)English665
Drop thy still dews of quietnessJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)English2
Father of all - we urge as our strong pleaJohn G. Whittier (Author)2
Father! to thy suff'ring poorJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)English2
Forever ours, for good or illJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
Forgive, O Lord, our severing waysJohn G. Whittier (Author)17
From the eternal shadowJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
God called the nearest Angels who dwell with Him aboveJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)English2
God giveth quietness at lastJohn G. Whittier (Author)15
Gott unsrer Väter, dessen HandJ. G. Whittier (Author)German2
Grown wiser for the lesson givenJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Happy he whose inward earJ. G. Whittier (Author)2
Hast thou, midst life's empty noisesWhittier (Author)32
Have ye heard of our huntingJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
He cometh not a king to reignJ. G. Whittier, 1808- (Author)21
He loathed the false, yet livedJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
He stood of old, the holy ChristJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
He who has the truth, and keeps itJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)4
Heap high the farmer's wintry hoardJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)8
Here we, today, admist our flowersJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)4
¡Hermano, ven y piensa en tu hermano!John Greenleaf Whittier (Author)Spanish2
Hom-frato, amu kore fraton vian!John Greenleaf Whittier (Author)Esperanto4
I ask not now for gold to gildJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)48
I bow my forehead to the dustJ. G. Whittier (Author)English107
I dimly guess from blessings knownJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
I feel the heart of silenceJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
I know not what the future hathJohn G. Whittier (Author)English56
I long for household voices goneJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)21
I mourn no more my vanished yearsJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
I pray for faith, I long for trustJohn G. Whittier (Author)8
I see the wrong that round me liesJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)22
I trace your lines of argumentWhittier (Author)2
I walk with bare, hushed feet the groundJohn G. Whittier (Author)English2
Immortal Love, for ever fullJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)English372
In calm and cool and silence once againJohn G. Whittier (Arranged from)2
In simple trust like theirs who heardWhittier (Author)2
Is this the land our fathers lovedJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
It may not be our lot to wield John G. Whittier (Author)52
Just God, and shall we calmly restJ. G. Whittier (Author)2
Ka Haku, ka Makua EJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)Hawaiian3
Know well, my soul, God's hand controlsJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)4
Know, where our duty's task isJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
Let every creature hail the mornJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
Let man be free, the mighty wordJohn G. Whittier (Author)6
Like a lion growling lowJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Lord, here amidst the poor and blindJohn Greenleaf Whittier, 1807-1892 (Author)2
May freedom speed onward, wherever the bloodWhittier (Author)11
My thoughts are all in yonder townJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
No bird-song floated down the hillJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
No longer forward or behindJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)21
Not always as the whirlwind's rushJohn G. Whittier (Author)5
Not empty worship the benignantJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
Now is the seed time, God aloneJohn G. Whittier (Author)14
O backward looking son of timeJohn G. Whittier (Author)7
O blessed Spirit in us allJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
O brother man, fold to thy heart thy brotherJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)211
O Dios Apo ken AmamiJohn G. Whittler (Author)Tagalog2
O Fairest-born of Love and LightJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)19
O friends, with whom my feet have trodJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)4
O he whom Jesus loved has truly spokenJohn G. Whittier (Author)33
O holy father just and trueJohn G. Whittier (Author)22
O Jesus Christ, Koda wakaŋJohn G. Whittier (Author)Dakota1
O lonely bay of TrinityJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
O Lord our God, in time to beJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
O love divine, whose constant beamJohn G. Whittier (Author)55
O love, O Life, our faith and sightJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)76
O maker of the fruits and flowersWhittier (Author)11
O none in all the world beforeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
O Painter of the fruits and flowersJohn G. Whittier (Author)8
O pure reformers, not in vainWhittier (Author)32
O sabbath rest of GalileeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)English3
O sometimes comes to soul and senseJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)9
O, sometimes gleams upon our sightJ. G. Whittier, 1807-1892 (Author)111
O strong, upwelling prayers of faithJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
O such' ihn nicht in Himmels-hoeh'nJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
O thou, at whose rebuke the graveJ. G. Whittier (Author)12
O thou who in the garden's shadeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
O Thou whose presence went beforeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)31
O true reformers, not in vainJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
O what though our feet may not treadJohn G. Whittier (Author)8
O wherefore the dream of the earthly abodeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)1
O'er us to the southland headingJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Oh amor, divino e inmortalJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)Spanish3
O not alone with outward signWhittier (Author)23
O Padre de la humanidadJohn G. Whittier (Author)Spanish7
¡Oh Padre nuestro celestialJohn Greenleaf Whittier, 1807-1892 (Author)Spanish2
Once more the liberal year laughs outJohn G. Whittier (Author)47
Our cause shall on and upward goJohn G. Whittier (Author)5
Our fathers' God, from out whose handJohn G. Whittier (Author)31
Our fellow countrymen in chainsJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Our Friend, our Brother, and our Lord John G. Whittier (Author)11
O Lord, and Master of us allJohn G. Whittier (Author)English80
Our thought of thee is glad with hopeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)29
Pardonne, ô Dieu les vain tourmentsJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)French2
Perdona, oh Dios, la divisiónJohn Greenleaf Whittier, 1807-1892 (Author)Spanish3
Rest for the weary hands is goodJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Ring, O bellsJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Shall we grow weary in our watchJohn G. Whittier (Author)19
Shall we, who sit beneath that treeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
So stood of old the holy ChristJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
Sound over all waters, reach out from all landsJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)26
Sport of the changeful multitudeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)1
Steep, and hung with clouds of strifeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Sunlight upon Judea's hillsJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
Sweeter than any songJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
Take courage, temperance workersJno. G. Whittier (Author)14
The airs of heaven blow o'er meJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
The doubts we vainly seek to solveJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
The fourteen centuries fall awayJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
The green earth sends its incense upJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
The harp at nature's advent strungJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)74
The night is the mother of the dayJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
The ocean looketh up to heavenJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)18
The path of life we walk todayJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
The snow plumed angel of the northJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)6
The southland hath its fields of caneJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)4
The west winds blow and singing lowJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
The wrong that pains my soul belowJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
Thine are all the gifts, O GodJ. G. Whittier (Author)English37
Thine is a griefJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
Thou God, who hast since time beganJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)English4
Thou hast fallen in thine armorJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Thou hast seen two streamlets gushingJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
Through the harsh noises of our dayJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Thy grace impart, in time to beJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)33
Thy task may well seem overhardJohn G. Whittier (Author)3
To weary hearts, to mourning homesWhittier (Translator)14
Today, beneath thy chastening eyeJohn G. Whittier (Author)11
Today, O God, amidst our flowersJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Unto the calmly gathered thoughtJohn G. Whittier (Author)12
Up, up, in nobler toil than oursJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Upon our pathway, wild and ruggedJ. G. Whittier (Author)2
Wake sisters wake! The daystar shinesJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)1
Wanikiya, NitacaŋkuJohn G. Whittier (Author)Dakota1
We cross the prairie as of oldJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
We faintly hear, we dimly seeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
We feel the heart of silenceJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
We may not climb the heavenly steepsJohn G. Whittier (Author)English349
We need love's tender lessons taughtJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)9
We see not, know not, all our wayJohn G. Whittier (Author)18
We shape ourselves the joy or fearJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)8
What is it that the crowd requiteJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
What matter though we seek with painJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
What thou wilt, O Father, giveJohn G. Whittier (Author)58
When freedom, on her natal dayJohn G. Whittier (Author)4
When, from each temple of the freeJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)4
When in the maddening maze of thingsJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)2
When on my day of life the night is fallingJohn Greenleaf Whittier, 1807-1892 (Author)98
"Where, in my name, meet two or three,"John Greenleaf Whittier (Author)1
Wherever through the ages riseJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)19
While day by day our loved oneJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
Who calls thy glorious service hardJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)9
Who counts his brother's welfareJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)5
Who fathoms the eternal thoughtJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)21
With peace that comesJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)3
With silence only as their benedictionWhittier (Author)English30
Within the maddening maze John G. Whittier (Author)19
Yet sometimes glimpses on my sightJohn Greenleaf Whittier (Author)7

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