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O Thou through suffering perfect made

Author: Bp. W. W. How Meter: 8.8.8.8 Appears in 15 hymnals First Line: O Thou thro' suffering perfect made Lyrics: 1 O Thou thro' suffering perfect made, On Whom the ... sickness, grief, and pain, No sufferer turns to Thee in vain ... Topics: Charities; Hospitals Used With Tune: [O Thou thro' suffering perfect made]

Ready to suffer grief or pain

Author: A. C. Palmer Appears in 95 hymnals Refrain First Line: Ready to go, ready to stay
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Here We Suffer Grief And Pain

Author: Thomas Bilby Appears in 61 hymnals Refrain First Line: Oh! that will be joyful! Lyrics: 1 Here we suffer grief and pain, Here we ... Used With Tune: [Here we suffer grief and pain] Text Sources: The Nursery Book, The Infant Teacher's Assistant , 1831-32

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THE OLD RUGGED CROSS

Composer: George Bennard Meter: Irregular with refrain Appears in 115 hymnals Tune Key: B Flat Major Incipit: 34546 55565 76 Used With Text: The Old Rugged Cross
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MY SAVIOR'S LOVE

Composer: Charles H. Gabriel Meter: 8.7.8.7 with refrain Appears in 79 hymnals Tune Key: A Flat Major Incipit: 55351 23177 71215 Used With Text: I Stand Amazed in the Presence
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EASTER HYMN

Meter: 7.7.7.7 with alleluias Appears in 250 hymnals Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 13514 66534 51434 Used With Text: Jesus Christ is risen today

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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Who Will Suffer with the Savior?

Author: Daniel S. Warner Hymnal: Timeless Truths #1032 Meter: 8.7.8.7 D Refrain First Line: Lord, we fellowship Thy passion Lyrics: 1 Who will suffer with the Savior? Take the ... , we fellowship Thy passion, Gladly suffer shame and loss; With Thy ... trod? [Refrain] 3 Who will suffer for the gospel, Follow Christ ... pure; Forward, brethren, work and suffer, Faithful to the end endure ... Scripture: Colossians 1:24 Tune Title: [Who will suffer with the Savior?]

The Son of Man Must Suffer

Author: Paul O. Davidson Hymnal: Singing the New Testament #52 (2008) First Line: "The Son of Man must suffer many things" Lyrics: Son of Man must suffer many things." So ... Topics: Suffering of Christ Scripture: Matthew 16:21 Languages: English Tune Title: [The Son of Man Must Suffer Many Things]
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Suffer the Children

Author: C. F. L. Hymnal: The Century Gospel Songs #17 (1901) First Line: Suffer the children, O beautiful words Refrain First Line: Suffer the children to come unto me Languages: English Tune Title: [Suffer the children, O beautiful words]

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Ira David Sankey

1840 - 1908 Composer of "['Tis only through suffering true life I may gain]" in The Cyber Hymnal Sankey, Ira David, was born in Edinburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1840, of Methodist parents. About 1856 he removed with his parents to Newcastle, Pennsylvania, where he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Four years afterwards he became the Superintendent of a large Sunday School in which he commenced his career of singing sacred songs and solos. Mr. Moody met with him and heard him sing at the International Convention of the Young Men's Christian Association, at Indianapolis, and through Mr. Moody's persuasion he joined him in his work at Chicago. After some two or three years' work in Chicago, they sailed for England on June 7, 1872, and held their first meeting at York a short time afterwards, only eight persons being present. Their subsequent work in Great Britain and America is well known. Mr. Sankey's special duty was the singing of sacred songs and solos at religious gatherings, a practice which was in use in America for some time before he adopted it. His volume of Sacred Songs and Solos is a compilation from various sources, mainly American and mostly in use before. Although known as Sankey and Moody’s Songs, only one song, "Home at last, thy labour done" is by Mr. Sankey, and not one is by Mr. Moody. Mr. Sankey supplied several of the melodies. The English edition of the Sacred Songs & Solos has had an enormous sale; and the work as a whole is very popular for Home Mission services. The Songs have been translated into several languages. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) Pseudonymns: Harry S. Low­er Rian A. Dykes ==================== Sankey, I. D., p. 994, i. During the past fifteen years Mr. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos have had a very large sale, which has justified him in increasing the number of songs and hymns, including " New Hymns and Solos," to 1200. In 1906 he published My Life and Sacred Songs (London : Morgan & Scott). In addition to the "Story of his Own Life," the work contains an account of the most popular of his solos, with interesting reminiscences of the spiritual awakening of many who were influenced through his singing of them in public. In this respect it corresponds in some measure with G. J. Stevenson's Methodist Hymn Book, &c, 1883 (p. 1094, i.). It is an addition to the Sacred Songs and Solos, which will be held in esteem by many. In addition to his hymn, noted on p. 994, ii., Mr. Sankey gives details of the following:— 1. Out of the shadow-land into the sunshine. [Heaven Anticipated.] Mr. Sankey's account of this hymn is:— "I wrote this hymn specially for the memorial service held for Mr. Moody in Carnegie Hall, where 1 also sang it as a solo. It is the last sacred song of which I wrote both the words and music. The idea was suggested by Mr. Moody's last words, 'Earth recedes; heaven opens before me . . . God is calling me, and I must go.' On account of its peculiar association with my fellow-labourer in the Gospel for so many years, the words are here given in full." The hymn follows on p. 185, in 3 stanzas of 4 lines and a chorus. 2. Rejoice! Rejoice! our King is coming, [Advent.] Mr. Sankey writes concerning this hymn:— "During one of my trips to Great Britain on the SS. City of Rome a storm raged on the sea. The wind was howling through the rigging, and waves like mountains of foam were breaking over the bow of the vessel. A great fear had fallen upon the passengers. When the storm was at its worst, we all thought we might soon go to the bottom of the sea. The conviction came to me that the Lord would be with us iu the trying hour, and sitting down in the reading room, I composed this hymn. Before reaching England the tune had formed itself in my mind, and on arriving in London I wrote it out, and had it published in Sacred Songs and Solos, where it is No. 524 in the edition. of 1888. From Mr. Sankey's autobiographical sketch we gather that he was born at Edinburgh, in Western Pennsylvania, Aug. 28, 1840, joined Mr. Moody in 1871, and visited England for the first time in 1873. The original of the Sacred Songs, &c, of 23 pieces only, was offered as a gift to the London publishers of P. Phillips's Hallowed Song, and declined by them. It was subsequently accepted by Mr. K. O. Morgan, of Morgan & Scott, and is now a volume of 1200 hymns. From a return kindly sent us by Messrs. Morgan & Scott, we find that the various issues of the Sacred Songs and Solos were:— In 1873, 24 pp.; 1874, 72 pp. ; 1876, 153 hymns; 1877, 271 hymns; 1881, 441 hymns; 1888, 750 hymns; 1903, 1200 hymns. In addition, The Christian Choir, which is generally associated with the Sacred Songs and Solos, was issued in 1884 with 75 hymns, and in 1896 with 281. The New Hymns & Solos, by the same firm, were published in 1888. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

William Walsham How

1823 - 1897 Person Name: Bp. W. W. How Author of "O Thou through suffering perfect made" in The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 How, William Walsham, D.D., son of William Wybergh How, Solicitor, Shrewsbury, was born Dec. 13, 1823, at Shrewsbury, and educated at Shrewsbury School and Wadham College, Oxford (B.A. 1845). Taking Holy Orders in 1846, he became successively Curate of St. George's, Kidderminster, 1846; and of Holy Cross, Shrewsbury, 1848. In 1851 he was preferred to the Rectory of Whittington, Diocese of St. Asaph, becoming Rural Dean in 1853, and Hon. Canon of the Cathedral in 1860. In 1879 he was appointed Rector of St. Andrew's Undershaft, London, and was consecrated Suffragan Bishop for East London, under the title of the Bishop of Bedford, and in 1888 Bishop of Wakefield. Bishop How is the author of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Commentary on the Four Gospels; Plain Words , Four Series; Plain Words for Children; Pastor in Parochia; Lectures on Pastoral Work; Three All Saints Summers, and Other Poems , and numerous Sermons , &c. In 1854 was published Psalms and Hymns, Compiled by the Rev. Thomas Baker Morrell, M.A., . . . and the Rev. William Walsham How, M.A. This was republished in an enlarged form in 1864, and to it was added a Supplement in 1867. To this collection Bishop How contributed several hymns, and also to the S. P. C. K. Church Hymns , of which he was joint editor, in 1871. The Bishop's hymns in common use amount in all to nearly sixty. Combining pure rhythm with great directness and simplicity, Bishop How's compositions arrest attention more through a comprehensive grasp of the subject and the unexpected light thrown upon and warmth infused into facia and details usually shunned by the poet, than through glowing imagery and impassioned rhetoric. He has painted lovely images woven with tender thoughts, but these are few, and found in his least appreciated work. Those compositions which have laid the firmest hold upon the Church, are simple, unadorned, but enthusiastically practical hymns, the most popular of which, "O Jesu, Thou art standing"; "For all the Saints who from their labours rest," and "We give Thee but Thine own," have attained to a foremost rank. His adaptations from other writers as in the case from Bishop Ken, "Behold, the Master passeth by," are good, and his Children's hymns are useful and popular. Without any claims to rank as a poet, in the sense in which Cowper and Montgomery were poets, he has sung us songs which will probably outlive all his other literary works. The more important of Bishop How's hymns, including those already named, and "Lord, Thy children guide and keep"; "O Word of God Incarnate"; "This day at Thy creating word"; "Who is this so weak and helpless"; and others which have some special history or feature of interest, are annotated under their respective first lines. The following are also in common use:— i. From Psalms & Hymns, 1854. 1. Before Thine awful presence, Lord. Confirmation. 2. Jesus, Name of wondrous love [priceless worth]. Circumcision. The Name Jesus . 3. Lord Jesus, when we stand afar. Passiontide. 4. O blessing rich, for sons of men. Members of Christ. 5. 0 Lord of Hosts, the earth is Thine. In time of War. 6. O Lord, Who in Thy wondrous love. Advent. ii. From Psalms & Hymns, enlarged, 1864. 7. Lord, this day Thy children meet. Sunday School Anniversary. iii. From Supplement to the Psalms & Hymns, 1867. 8. Hope of hopes and joy of joys. Resurrection. 9. 0 daughters blest of Galilee. For Associations of Women. 10. O happy feet that tread. Public Worship. 11. With trembling awe the chosen three. Transfiguration. iv. From Parish Magazine, 1871, and Church Hymns, 1871. 12. O Jesu, crucified for man. Friday. 13. Yesterday, with worship blest. Monday. v. From the S. P. C. K. Church Hymns. 1871. 14. Bowed low in supplication. For the Parish. 15. Great Gabriel sped on wings of light. Annunciation, of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 16. O blest was he, whose earlier skill. St. Luke. 17. O God, enshrined in dazzling light. Omnipresence. Divine Worship . 18. O heavenly Fount of Light and Love. Witsuntide. 19. O Lord, it is a blessed thing. Weekdays. 20. 0 One with God the Father. Epiphany. 21. O Thou through suffering perfect made. Hospitals. 22. Rejoice, ye sons of men. Purification of the B. V. M. 23. Summer suns are glowing. Summer. 24. The year is swiftly waning. Autumn. 25. Thou art the Christ, O Lord. St. Peter. 26. To Thee our God we fly. National Hymn. 27. Upon the holy Mount they stood. Transfiguration and Church Guilds. 28. We praise Thy grace, 0 Saviour. St. Mark. vi. From the S. P. C. K. Children's Hymns, 1872. 29. Behold a little child. Jesus the Child's Example. 30. Come, praise your Lord and Saviour. Children's Praises. 31. It is a thing most wonderful. Sunday School Anniversary. 32. On wings of living light. Easter. Bishop How's hymns and sacred and secular pieces were collected and published as Poems and Hymns, 1886. The Hymns, 54 in all, are also published separately. He d. Aug. 10, 1897. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =================== How, W. W., p. 540, i. He died Aug. 10, 1897. His Memoir, by F. D. How, was published in 1898. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Jesse Randall Baxter Jr.

1887 - 1960 Person Name: J. R. Baxter, Jr. Author of "He Bore It All" in Sacred Selections for the Church Jesse Randall (Pap) Baxter, Jr. (1887-1960) Born: December 8, 1887, Lebanon, Alabama. Died: January 21, 1960. Baxter grew up in De­Kalb Coun­ty, Al­a­ba­ma. In 1926, he bought part of Vir­gil Stamps’ Gos­pel mu­sic firm, which be­came the Stamps-Bax­ter Mu­sic and Print­ing Com­pa­ny, one of the most suc­cess­ful Gos­pel mu­sic pub­lish­ers of the ear­ly 20th Century. Bax­ter ran the com­pa­ny’s Chat­ta­noo­ga, Ten­nes­see, of­fice un­til Stamps’ death in 1940, then moved to Dall­as, Tex­as, to run the main of­fice. Af­ter Bax­ter’s death, his Clarice ran the bus­i­ness un­til she died; it was then sold to Zon­der­van. Bax­ter was in­duct­ed in­to the South­ern Gos­pel Mu­sic As­so­ci­a­tion Hall of Fame in 1997. Lyrics-- After the Sun­rise Farther Along God Shall Wipe Away All Tears (© 1940) He Bore It All I Have Peace in My Soul I Hold His Hand (© 1929) I Love My Sav­ior, Too I Want to Help Some Wea­ry Pil­grim I’m Liv­ing in Ca­naan Now Living Grace Praise the Lamb of God Something Hap­pens Travel the Sun­lit Way Try Je­sus When He Blessed My Soul When We Meet to Part No More --hymntime.com/tch

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Songs for Suffering Saints

Publication Date: 2004 Publisher: Eric Schumacher Publication Place: Keokuk, Iowa Editors: Eric Schumacher

Songs in the Night; or Hymns for the Sick and Suffering. 2nd ed.

Publication Date: 1853 Publisher: S. K. Whipple & Co. Publication Place: Boston, Mass. Editors: Augustus Charles Thompson; S. K. Whipple & Co.

Divine Hymns on the Sufferings of Christ

Publication Date: 1805 Publication Place: Greenwich, Mass. Editors: Solomon Howe

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