Blessed Jesus, here we stand

Representative Text

1 Dearest Jesus, we are here,
gladly your command obeying.
With this child we now draw near
in response to your own saying
that to you it shall be given
as a child and heir of heaven.

2 Your command is clear and plain,
and we would obey it duly:
"You must all be born again,
heart and life renewing truly,
born of water and the Spirit,
and my kingdom thus inherit."

3 This is why we come to you,
in our arms this infant bearing.
Truly, here your grace we view.
Let this child, your mercy sharing,
in your arms be shielded ever,
yours on earth and yours forever.

4 Gracious Head, your member own;
Shepherd, take your lamb and feed it;
Prince of Peace, make here your throne;
Way of life, to heaven lead it;
precious Vine, let nothing sever
from your side this branch forever.


Source: Glory to God: the Presbyterian Hymnal #483

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth (b. Holborn, London, England, 1827; d. Monnetier, Savoy, France, 1878) is well known for her English translations of German hymns; her translations were polished and yet remained close to the original. Educated initially by her mother, she lived with relatives in Dresden, Germany, in 1845, where she acquired her knowledge of German and interest in German hymnody. After residing near Manchester until 1862, she moved to Clifton, near Bristol. A pioneer in promoting women's rights, Winkworth put much of her energy into the encouragement of higher education for women. She translated a large number of German hymn texts from hymnals owned by a friend, Baron Bunsen. Though often altered, these translations continue to be used i… Go to person page >

Author: Benjamin Schmolck

Schmolck, Benjamin, son of Martin Schmolck, or Schmolcke, Lutheran pastor at Brauchitschdorf (now Chrόstnik) near Liegnitz in Silesia (now Poland) was born at Brauchitschdorf, Dec. 21, 1672. He entered the Gymnasium at Lauban in 1688, and spent five years there. After his return home he preached for his father a sermon which so struck the patron of the living that he made Benjamin an allowance for three years to enable him to study theology. He matriculated, at Michaelmas, 1693, at the University of Leipzig, where he came under the influence of J. Olearius, J. B. Carpzov, and others, and throughout his life retained the character of their teaching, viz. a warm and living practical Christianity, but Churchly in tone and not Pietistic. In th… Go to person page >

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The Cyber Hymnal #535
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Instances

Instances (1 - 11 of 11)

Ambassador Hymnal #274

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Christian Worship #295

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Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #244

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Evangelical Lutheran Worship #443

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Glory to God #483

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Lutheran Service Book #592

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Lutheran Worship #226

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Rejoice in the Lord #530

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The Cyber Hymnal #535

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The Presbyterian Hymnal #493

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Together in Song #480

Include 53 pre-1979 instances
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