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Baptized into Thy Name Most Holy

Representative Text

1 Baptized into your name most holy,
O Father, Son, and Holy Ghost,
I claim a place, tho' weak and lowly,
among your seed, your chosen host.
Buried with Christ and dead to sin:
your Spirit e'er shall live within.

2 My loving Father, me you've taken
fore'er to be your child and heir;
my faithful Savior, me you've given
your righteous, holy life to share;
O Holy Spirit, you will be
a comfort, guide, and help to me.

3 And I have vowed to fear and love you,
and to obey you, Lord, alone;
because the Holy Spirit moved me,
I dared to pledge myself your own,
renouncing sin to keep the faith
and war with evil unto death.

4 My faithful God, your word fails never,
your cov'nant surely will abide;
oh, cast me not away forever,
should I transgress it on my side!
Though I have oft my soul defiled,
in love forgive, restore your child.

5 Yes, all I am and love most dearly
I offer now, O Lord, to you.
Oh, let me make my vows sincerely,
and what I say, help me to do.
Let naught within me, naught I own,
serve any will but yours alone.

6 And never let my purpose falter,
O Father, Son, and Holy Ghost,
but keep me faithful to your altar,
till you shall call me from my post.
So unto you I live and die
and praise you evermore on high.

Source: Trinity Psalter Hymnal #193

Translator: Catherine Winkworth

Catherine Winkworth (b. Holborn, London, England, 1827; d. Monnetier, Savoy, France, 1878) is well known for her English translations of German hymns; her translations were polished and yet remained close to the original. Educated initially by her mother, she lived with relatives in Dresden, Germany, in 1845, where she acquired her knowledge of German and interest in German hymnody. After residing near Manchester until 1862, she moved to Clifton, near Bristol. A pioneer in promoting women's rights, Winkworth put much of her energy into the encouragement of higher education for women. She translated a large number of German hymn texts from hymnals owned by a friend, Baron Bunsen. Though often altered, these translations continue to be used i… Go to person page >

Author: J. J. Rambach

Rambach, Johann Jakob, D.D., son of Hans Jakob Rambach, cabinet maker at Halle on the Saale, was born at Halle, Feb. 24, 1693. In 1706 he left school and entered his father's workshop, but, in the autumn of 1707, he dislocated his ankle. During his illness he turned again to his schoolbooks; the desire for learning reawoke; and on his recovery, early in 1708, he entered the Latin school of the Orphanage at Halle (Glaucha). On Oct. 27, 1712, he matriculated at the University of Halle as a student of medicine, but soon turned his attention to theology. He became specially interested in the study of the Old Testament under J. H. Michaelis. In May 1715 he became one of Michaelis's assistants in preparing his edition of the Hebrew Bible, for whi… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Baptized into Thy name most holy
Title: Baptized into Thy Name Most Holy
German Title: Ich bin getauft auf deinen Namen
Author: J. J. Rambach (1723)
Translator: Catherine Winkworth
Meter: 9.8.9.8.8.8
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

O DASS ICH TAUSEND ZUNGEN HÄTTE (Dretzel)


O DASS ICH TAUSEND ZUNGEN HÄTTE

Johann Balthaser König (b. Waltershausen, near Gotha, Germany, 1691; d. Frankfurt, Germany, 1758) composed this tune, which later became associated with Johann Mentzer's hymn "O dass ich tausend Zungen hätte" (Oh, That I Had a Thousand Voices). The harmonization is from the Wurttembergische Choral…

Go to tune page >


WER WEISS, WIE NAHE MIR MEIN ENDE (51566)


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #532
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 13 of 13)

Ambassador Hymnal #272

Text

Christian Worship #294

Church Hymnal, Fifth Edition #390

Text

Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #242

TextPage Scan

Lutheran Service Book #590

TextPage Scan

Lutheran Worship #224

Praise y Adoración #78a

TextPage Scan

Rejoice in the Lord #529

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #532

TextPage Scan

The New Century Hymnal #324

Text

Together in Song #481

TextPage Scan

Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) #415

TextPage Scan

Trinity Psalter Hymnal #193

Include 30 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



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