My Saviour and My Lord

Translator: Richard Birch Hoyle

Born: March 8, 1875, Clough­fold, Lan­ca­shire, Eng­land. Died: De­cem­ber 14, 1939, Wim­ble­don, Sur­rey, Eng­land. Hoyle at­tend­ed Re­gent’s Park Coll­ege in Lon­don, then pas­tored in Sud­bu­ry, Ab­er­deen, and Lon­don (1900-17), and in Bel­ve­dere, Kent (1923-26). He ed­it­ed the YMCA’s Red Tri­an­gle mag­az­ine, and was pro­fess­or of the­ol­o­gy at West­ern The­o­lo­gic­al Sem­in­a­ry, Pitts­burgh, Penn­syl­van­ia (1934-36). He lat­er re­turned to Eng­land, pas­tor­ing at the Bap­tist church in Kings­ton-on-Thames. Some of his work ap­pears in the World Stu­dent Chris­tian Fed­er­a­tion hym­nal Can­ta­te Do­mi­no (1925). Translations: Holy God, Thy Name… Go to person page >

Author: Alexander Rodolphe Vinet (1799-1847)

Vinet, Alexandre Rodolphe, born June 12, 1799, at Ouchy, near Lausanne. His father, a man of somewhat stern religion, was schoolmaster of the village, and held a small appointment in the Canton du Vaud, Alexandre was appointed Professor of the French language at the gymnasium of Basle, at the age of 20, and occupied this office, with same work for the University, for twenty years. In 1819 he was called to the ministry, and married. At first opposed to the movement of the Réveil a deeper knowledge of its principles and deep sympathy with the persecution of its leaders, drew him heartily to its side. His pen was fearlessly used in defence of toleration (Du respect des opinion, 1824), freedom of worship (Mémoire en faveur de la liberty des… Go to person page >

Alterer: John J. Overholt

John J. Overholt was born to an Amish family of limited means in the state of Ohio in 1918. As a child he was soon introduced to his father's personal collection of gospel songs and hymns, which was to have a marked influence on his later life. With his twin brother Joe, he early was exposed to the Amish-Mennonite tradition of hymn singing and praising worship. An early career in Christian service led to a two-year period of relief work in the country of Poland following World War II. During that interim he began to gather many European songs and hymns as a personal hobby, not realizing that these selections would become invaluable to The Christian Hymnary which was begun in 1960 and completed twelve years later in 1972, with a compilati… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: My Savior and my Lord, let our lips now acclaim Thee
Title: My Saviour and My Lord
French Title: O Seigneur, o Sauveur
Alterer: John J. Overholt (1964)
Translator: Richard Birch Hoyle
Author: Alexander Rodolphe Vinet (1799-1847) (1828)
Meter: 7.6.7.6 D
Language: English
Publication Date: 1972
Copyright: Text Copyright © 1972 by The Christian Hymnary Publishers

Tune

GREENLAND (Haydn)

GREENLAND, an example of the popular nineteenth-century practice of creating hymn tunes from the works of classical composers, is thought to be originally from one of J. Michael Haydn's (PHH 67) "Deutschen Kirchen Messen." The tune acquired its title from its occasional association with the text "Fr…

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Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)

The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 #353

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