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Na foed im feddwl, ddydd na nos (By day or night my thought is loss)

Author: William Williams

William Williams, called the "Watts of Wales," was born in 1717, at Cefn-y-coed, near Llandovery, Carmarthenshire. He originally studied medicine, but abandoned it for theology. He was ordained Deacon in the Church of England, but was refused Priest's Orders, and subsequently attached himself to the Calvinistic Methodists. For half a century he travelled in Wales, preaching the Gospel. He died in 1791. Williams composed his hymns chiefly in the Welsh language; they are still largely used by various religious bodies in the principality. Many of his hymns have appeared in English, and have been collected and published by Sedgwick. His two principal poetical works are "Hosannah to the Son of David," and "Gloria in Excelsis." --Annotati… Go to person page >

Translator: Daniel Hughes

(no biographical information available about Daniel Hughes.) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Na foed im feddwl, ddydd na nos (By day or night my thought is loss)
Original Language: Welsh
Author: William Williams
Translator: Daniel Hughes
Language: English; Welsh

Tune

OLD 113TH

GENEVAN 68 is usually attributed to Matthäus Greiter (b. Aichach, Bavaria, 1490; d. Strasbourg, France, 1550). It was published as a setting for Psalm 119 in Das dritt theil Strassburger Kirchenampt (1525), which Greiter and his friend Wolfgang Dachstein edited. Greiter studied at Freiburg Universi…

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