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O Son of God, We Wait for Thee

O Son of God, we wait for Thee, We long for Thine appearing

Author: Philip Frederick Hiller; Translator: Joseph Augustus Seiss
Tune: WAS GOTT TUT
Published in 17 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 O Son of God, we wait for Thee,
We long for Thine appearing;
We know Thou sittest on the throne,
And we Thy Name are bearing.
Who trusts in Thee,
May joyful be,
And see Thee, Lord, descending
To bring us bliss unending.

2 We wait for Thee, ’mid toil and pain,
In weariness and sighing;
But glad that Thou our guilt hast borne,
And canceled it by dying.
Hence, cheerfully
May we with Thee
Take up our cross and bear it,
Till we relief inherit.

3 We wait for Thee; here Thou hast won
Our hearts to hope and duty;
But while our spirits feel Thee near,
Our eyes would see Thy beauty;
We fain would be
At rest with Thee
In peace and joy supernal,
In glorious life eternal.

4 We wait for Thee; sure Thou wilt come,
The time is swiftly nearing;
In this we also now rejoice,
And long for Thine appearing.
Oh, bliss ’twill be
When Thee we see,
Homeward Thy people bringing,
With transport and with singing!



Source: Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #536

Author: Philip Frederick Hiller

Hiller, Philipp Friedrich, son of Johann Jakob Hiller, pastor at Mühlhausen on the the Enz, Württemberg, was born at Mühlhausen, Jan. 6, 1699. He was educated at the clergy training schools at Denkendorf (under J. A. Bengel) and Maulbronn, and the University of Tübingen (M.A. 1720). His first clerical appointment was as assistant at Brettach, near Neckarsulm, 1724-27. He afterwards held similar posts at Hessigheim and elsewhere, and was also, from 1729-31, a private tutor at Nürnberg. He was then, on St. Bartholomew's Day, 1732, instituted as pastor of Neckargröningen, on the Neckar, near Marbach. In 1736 he became pastor of his native place, and in 1748 pastor at Steinheim, near Heidenheim. In his third year of residence at Steinheim… Go to person page >

Translator: Joseph Augustus Seiss

Joseph A. Seiss was born and raised in a Moravian home with the original family name of Seuss. After studying at Pennsylvania College in Gettysburg and completing his theological education with tutors and through private study, Seiss became a Lutheran pastor in 1842. He served several Lutheran congregations in Virginia and Maryland and then became pastor of St. John's Lutheran Church (1858-1874) and the Church of the Holy Communion (1874-1904), both in Philadelphia. Known as an eloquent and popular preacher, Seiss was also a prolific author and editor of some eighty volumes, which include The Last Times (1856), The Evangelical Psalmist (1859), Ecclesia Lutherana (1868), Lectures on the Gospels (1868-1872), and Lectures on the Epistles (1885… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O Son of God, we wait for Thee, We long for Thine appearing
Title: O Son of God, We Wait for Thee
German Title: Wir warten dein, o Gottes Sohn
Author: Philip Frederick Hiller
Translator: Joseph Augustus Seiss
Meter: 8.7.8.7.4.4.7.7
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

WAS GOTT TUT

WAS GOTT TUT is usually attributed to Severus Gastorius (b. Ottern, near Weimar, Germany, 1646; d. Jena, Germany, 1682), who presumably composed the tune during a convalescence in 1675 (see above). The tune was published in Ausserlesenes Weimarisches Gesangbuch (1681). Educated at the University of…

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O JESU CHRIST, DU HÖCHSTES GUT


MEINE HOFFNUNG

MEINE HOFFNUNG received its name from its association with Joachim Neander's (PHH 244) text "Meine Hoffnung stehet feste" ("All My Hope on God Is Founded"). The tune was published with Newton's text in Neander's Alpha and Omega (1680). (The chorale found in Johann S. Bach's Cantata 40 is very loosel…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #5316
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)
TextPage Scan

Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #536

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #5316

Include 15 pre-1979 instances
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