Señor, Tu Aparición Esperamos

Author: Philipp Friedrich Hiller

Hiller, Philipp Friedrich, son of Johann Jakob Hiller, pastor at Mühlhausen on the the Enz, Württemberg, was born at Mühlhausen, Jan. 6, 1699. He was educated at the clergy training schools at Denkendorf (under J. A. Bengel) and Maulbronn, and the University of Tübingen (M.A. 1720). His first clerical appointment was as assistant at Brettach, near Neckarsulm, 1724-27. He afterwards held similar posts at Hessigheim and elsewhere, and was also, from 1729-31, a private tutor at Nürnberg. He was then, on St. Bartholomew's Day, 1732, instituted as pastor of Neckargröningen, on the Neckar, near Marbach. In 1736 he became pastor of his native place, and in 1748 pastor at Steinheim, near Heidenheim. In his third year of residence at Steinheim… Go to person page >

Tr. cast.: Nicolás Martínez

(no biographical information available about Nicolás Martínez.) Go to person page >

Tr. ingl.: Joseph A. Seiss

Joseph A. Seiss was born and raised in a Moravian home with the original family name of Seuss. After studying at Pennsylvania College in Gettysburg and completing his theological education with tutors and through private study, Seiss became a Lutheran pastor in 1842. He served several Lutheran congregations in Virginia and Maryland and then became pastor of St. John's Lutheran Church (1858-1874) and the Church of the Holy Communion (1874-1904), both in Philadelphia. Known as an eloquent and popular preacher, Seiss was also a prolific author and editor of some eighty volumes, which include The Last Times (1856), The Evangelical Psalmist (1859), Ecclesia Lutherana (1868), Lectures on the Gospels (1868-1872), and Lectures on the Epistles (1885… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Señor Jesús, tu aparición
Title: Señor, Tu Aparición Esperamos
Author: Philipp Friedrich Hiller
Tr. ingl.: Joseph A. Seiss (1890)
Tr. cast.: Nicolás Martínez
Language: Spanish

Tune

WAS GOTT TUT

WAS GOTT TUT is usually attributed to Severus Gastorius (b. Ottern, near Weimar, Germany, 1646; d. Jena, Germany, 1682), who presumably composed the tune during a convalescence in 1675 (see above). The tune was published in Ausserlesenes Weimarisches Gesangbuch (1681). Educated at the University of…

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Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)

Cántico Nuevo #414

Himnario Metodista #213

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