The God whom earth and sea and sky

Representative Text

1 The God whom earth and sea and sky
adore and laud and magnify,
whose might they own, whose praise they tell,
in Mary's body deigned to dwell.

2 O Mother blest, the chosen shrine
wherein the Architect divine,
whose hand contains the earth and sky,
vouchsafed in hidden guise to lie:

3 Blest in the message Gabriel brought;
blest in the work the Spirit wrought;
most blest, to bring to human birth
the long-desired of all the earth.

4 O Lord, the Virgin-born, to thee
eternal praise and glory be,
whom with the Father we adore
and Holy Ghost for evermore. Amen.

Source: Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #316

Translator: J. M. Neale

John M. Neale's life is a study in contrasts: born into an evangelical home, he had sympathies toward Rome; in perpetual ill health, he was incredibly productive; of scholarly tem­perament, he devoted much time to improving social conditions in his area; often ignored or despised by his contemporaries, he is lauded today for his contributions to the church and hymnody. Neale's gifts came to expression early–he won the Seatonian prize for religious poetry eleven times while a student at Trinity College, Cambridge, England. He was ordained in the Church of England in 1842, but ill health and his strong support of the Oxford Movement kept him from ordinary parish ministry. So Neale spent the years between 1846 and 1866 as a warden of Sackvi… Go to person page >

Author: Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus

Venantius Honorius Clematianus Fortunatus (b. Cenada, near Treviso, Italy, c. 530; d. Poitiers, France, 609) was educated at Ravenna and Milan and was converted to the Christian faith at an early age. Legend has it that while a student at Ravenna he contracted a disease of the eye and became nearly blind. But he was miraculously healed after anointing his eyes with oil from a lamp burning before the altar of St. Martin of Tours. In gratitude Fortunatus made a pilgrimage to that saint's shrine in Tours and spent the rest of his life in Gaul (France), at first traveling and composing love songs. He developed a platonic affection for Queen Rhadegonda, joined her Abbey of St. Croix in Poitiers, and became its bishop in 599. His Hymns far all th… Go to person page >

Text Information

Tune

EISENACH (Gesius)

MACHS MIT MIR was first published in the collection of music Das ander Theil des andern newen Operis Geistlicher Deutscher Lieder (1605) by Bartholomäus Gesius (b. Münchenberg, near Frankfurt, Germany, c. 1555; d. Frankfurt, 1613). A prolific composer, Gesius wrote almost exclusively for the churc…

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PUER NOBIS NASCITUR

PUER NOBIS is a melody from a fifteenth-century manuscript from Trier. However, the tune probably dates from an earlier time and may even have folk roots. PUER NOBIS was altered in Spangenberg's Christliches GesangbUchlein (1568), in Petri's famous Piae Cantiones (1582), and again in Praetorius's (P…

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ST. AMBROSE (11234)


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The Cyber Hymnal #2074
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Instances

Instances (1 - 11 of 11)
Text

Ancient and Modern #316

Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #708

TextPage Scan

Catholic Book of Worship III #464

Text

Common Praise (1998) #267

Page Scan

Common Praise #243

Hymns Ancient and Modern, New Standard Edition #309

Page Scan

Journeysongs (2nd ed.) #514

TextPage Scan

Journeysongs (3rd ed.) #493

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #2074

TextPage Scan

Worship (3rd ed.) #405

TextFlexscorePage Scan

Worship (4th ed.) #447

Include 23 pre-1979 instances
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