953

Now Blessed Be the Lord Our God

Full Text

1 Now blessed be the Lord our God,
the God of Israel,
for he alone does wondrous works:
his glorious deeds excel;
for he alone does wondrous works:
his glorious deeds excel.

2 And blessed be his glorious name
through all eternity;
the whole earth let his glory fill:
Amen! so shall it be;
the whole earth let his glory fill:
Amen! so shall it be.

see more

Scripture References

Further Reflections on Scripture References

Each of the internal "books" or original anthologies within the book of Psalms concludes with its own doxology. Psalm 72, at the end of Book II, features a doxology at verses 18 and 19. That biblical text is paraphrased in this hymn, a paraphrase originally published in the 1650 edition of the Scottish Psalter. However, what was originally a standard four-line common-meter text has been stretched into common meter of six lines to suit the tune.
"Now Blessed Be" is cast in the berakah form common in Jewish worship. God is to be blessed, or praised, because of his wondrous works and mighty deeds (st. 1) and because his saving acts reveal his glory throughout the earth and throughout eternity (st. 2). Amen and Amen! So shall it be!
 
Bert Polman, Psalter Hymnal Handbook

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

How can the worshiper not conclude with such acclamations! When God is the “overflowing source of all good” (Belgic Confession, Article 1) and when he has provided all the benefits of Christ’s atonement and makes them ours so that “they are more than enough to absolve us from our sins,” (Belgic Confession, Article 22) our hearts cry out to him with praise and adoration. Therefore, Heidelberg Catechism, Lord’s Day 52, Question and Answer 128 includes the ending doxology of the Lord’s Prayer and teaches that “your holy name, and not we ourselves, should receive all the praise, forever.” And so consistent with these thoughts, Our World Belongs to God, paragraph 2 exclaims, “Our World Belongs to God! God is King: Let the earth be glad! Christ is victor: His rule has begun! The Spirit is at work: Creation is renewed! Hallelujah! Praise the Lord!” And the Belhar Confession, Section 5 concludes: “Jesus is Lord. To the one and only God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, be the honor and the glory forever and ever.”
953

Now Blessed Be the Lord Our God

Additional Prayers

God of every nation, your law is right, your rule is just,
and even in this fallen world your kingdom knows no boundaries.
May the compassion, patience, and forgiveness you show us in Jesus Christ our Savior
form the ministry of reconciliation we offer to all people in Jesus’ name. Amen.

A Prayer of Acclamation
 
Wondrous God, you called whole worlds into being.
Blessed be the Lord our God.
You elected Israel to serve the nations.
Blessed be the Lord our God.
You made peace through Jesus’ blood, shed on the cross.
Blessed be the Lord our God. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
953

Now Blessed Be the Lord Our God

Tune Information

Name
CORONATION
Key
G Major
Meter
8.6.8.6.8.6

Recordings

953

Now Blessed Be the Lord Our God

Hymn Story/Background

Each of the internal "books" or original anthologies within the book of Psalms concludes with its own doxology. Psalm 72, at the end of Book II, features a doxology at verses 18 and 19. That biblical text is paraphrased in this hymn, a paraphrase originally published in the 1650 edition of the Scottish Psalter. However, what was originally a standard four-line common-meter text has been stretched into common meter of six lines to suit the tune.
 
"Now Blessed Be" is cast in the berakah form common in Jewish worship. God is to be blessed, or praised, because of his wondrous works and mighty deeds (st. 1) and because his saving acts reveal his glory throughout the earth and throughout eternity (st. 2). Amen and Amen! So shall it be! 
 
The tune by Olivet Holden is named CORONATION after the theme of the hymn for which it was composed: “All Hail the Power of Jesus’ Name.” It first appeared in Holden’s Union Harmony collection of 1793.  CORONATION is the one eighteenth-century American tune that has enjoyed uninterrupted popularity–from the singing schools of that era to today's congregational worship.
 
CORONATION is a vigorous marching tune with many repeated tones that delighted Holden's contemporaries. The tune requires the jubilant repetition of the last couplet of text for each stanza. Sing in parts and accompany with a firm sense of rhythm.
 
This doxology invites full voices with a vigorous accompaniment that grows in strength until the final "Amen."
— Bert Polman

Composer Information

Holden (1765-1844) was reared in a small rural community and had only a minimal formal education–a few months in a "common school" in Groton, Massachusetts. He worked as a carpenter and was involved in community service in Charlestown, holding posts in the Anti-Slavery Society and serving in the Massachusetts House of Representatives. In addition he worked very profitably as a merchant and real estate dealer, and served as a Puritan lay preacher. Very interested in music, Holden became a composer and singing-school teacher in the tradition of William Billings. He was involved in publishing various tune books, including The American Harmony (1792), The Massachusetts Compiler (1795), Plain Psalmody (1800), and The Charlestown Collection of Sacred Songs (1803).
— Bert Polman
General Settings
Stanza Selection
Voice Selection
Text size:
Music size:
Transpose (Half Steps):
Capo:
Contacting server...
Contacting server...

Questions? Check out the FAQ
Download:
This is a preview of your FlexScore.



Advertisements