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Lord, how secure my conscience was

Appears in 126 hymnals Used With Tune: MARLOW
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Holy Fear, and Tenderness of Conscience

Appears in 66 hymnals First Line: With my whole heart I've sought thy face Lyrics: ... my heart, To keep my conscience clean, And be an everlasting ... Topics: Conscience tender; Conscience tender Scripture: Psalm 119:174

Christ's plea to the conscience

Author: O. G. Jordan Appears in 2 hymnals First Line: There's a knock at the door of your conscience Refrain First Line: O sinner, make haste, let the Savior come in

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OLD 113TH

Composer: V. Earle Copes; Matthäus Greiter Meter: 8.8.8.8.8.8 Appears in 69 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 11231 34554 32134 Used With Text: I'll Praise My Maker While I've Breath
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RESTORATION

Composer: Charles H. Webb Meter: 8.7.8.7 with refrain Appears in 82 hymnals Tune Sources: The Southern Harmony, 1835 Tune Key: f minor Incipit: 13317 13317 57771 Used With Text: Come, Ye Sinners, Poor and Needy
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CANTERBURY

Composer: Orlando Gibbons Meter: 7.7.7.7 Appears in 87 hymnals Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 34562 23567 16653 Used With Text: Holy Spirit, Truth Divine

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals
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The Bells of Conscience

Author: J. M. D. Hymnal: Triumphant Songs No.1 #62 (1887) First Line: The conscience of childhood is speaking in whispers Refrain First Line: The bells of your conscience are ringing Lyrics: ... Refrain: The bells of your conscience are ringing The bells, the ... bells, The bells of your conscience are ringing, Saying sinner, Oh ... law fulfill. [Refrain] 3 The conscience of manhood is loudly appealing ... delay. [Refrain] 4 The conscience of old age is heavily ... Languages: English Tune Title: [The conscience of childhood is speaking in whispers]
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The Bells Of Conscience

Author: James M. Dungan Hymnal: The Cyber Hymnal #11698 First Line: The conscience of childhood is speaking in whispers Refrain First Line: The bells of your conscience are ringing Lyrics: ... Refrain: The bells of your conscience are ringing, The bells, the ... bells; The bells of your conscience are ringing, Saying, "Sinner, ... fulfill. [Refrain] 3 The conscience of manhood is loudly appealing ... delay. [Refrain] 4 The conscience of old age is heavily ... Languages: English Tune Title: [The conscience of childhood is speaking in whispers]
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The Bells of Conscience

Author: J. M. Dungan Hymnal: Christian Gospel Hymns #46 (1909) First Line: The conscience of childhood is speaking in whispers Refrain First Line: The bells of your conscience are ringing Languages: English Tune Title: [The conscience of childhood is speaking in whispers]

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B. D. Ackley

1872 - 1958 Composer of "[There is work awaiting you]" in Williston Hymns Bentley DeForrest Ackley was born 27 September 1872 in Spring Hill, Pennsylvania. He was the oldest son of Stanley Frank Ackley and the brother of A. H. Ackley. In his early years, he traveled with his father and his father's band. He learned to play several musical instruments. By the age of 16, after the family had moved to New York, he began to play the organ for churches. He married Bessie Hill Morley on 20 December 1893. In 1907 he joined the Billy Sunday and Homer Rodeheaver evangelist team as secretary/pianist. He worked for and traveled with the Billy Sunday organization for 8 years. He also worked as an editor for the Homer Rodeheaver publishing company. He composed more than 3000 tunes. He died 3 September 1958 in Winona Hills, Indiana at the age of 85 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Warsaw, Indiana, near his friend Homer Rodeheaver. Dianne Shapiro (from ackleyfamilygenealogy.com by Ed Ackley and Allen C. Ackley)

Isaac Watts

1674 - 1748 Person Name: Isaac Watts, 1674-1748 Author of "Lord, how secure my conscience was [lay]" in The National Baptist Hymnal Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary labours. He did not retire from ministerial duties, but preached as often as his delicate health would permit. The number of Watts' publications is very large. His collected works, first published in 1720, embrace sermons, treatises, poems and hymns. His "Horae Lyricae" was published in December, 1705. His "Hymns" appeared in July, 1707. The first hymn he is said to have composed for religious worship, is "Behold the glories of the Lamb," written at the age of twenty. It is as a writer of psalms and hymns that he is everywhere known. Some of his hymns were written to be sung after his sermons, giving expression to the meaning of the text upon which he had preached. Montgomery calls Watts "the greatest name among hymn-writers," and the honour can hardly be disputed. His published hymns number more than eight hundred. Watts died November 25, 1748, and was buried at Bunhill Fields. A monumental statue was erected in Southampton, his native place, and there is also a monument to his memory in the South Choir of Westminster Abbey. "Happy," says the great contemporary champion of Anglican orthodoxy, "will be that reader whose mind is disposed, by his verses or his prose, to imitate him in all but his non-conformity, to copy his benevolence to men, and his reverence to God." ("Memorials of Westminster Abbey," p. 325.) --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872. ================================= Watts, Isaac, D.D. The father of Dr. Watts was a respected Nonconformist, and at the birth of the child, and during its infancy, twice suffered imprisonment for his religious convictions. In his later years he kept a flourishing boarding school at Southampton. Isaac, the eldest of his nine children, was born in that town July 17, 1674. His taste for verse showed itself in early childhood. He was taught Greek, Latin, and Hebrew by Mr. Pinhorn, rector of All Saints, and headmaster of the Grammar School, in Southampton. The splendid promise of the boy induced a physician of the town and other friends to offer him an education at one of the Universities for eventual ordination in the Church of England: but this he refused; and entered a Nonconformist Academy at Stoke Newington in 1690, under the care of Mr. Thomas Rowe, the pastor of the Independent congregation at Girdlers' Hall. Of this congregation he became a member in 1693. Leaving the Academy at the age of twenty, he spent two years at home; and it was then that the bulk of the Hymns and Spiritual Songs (published 1707-9) were written, and sung from manuscripts in the Southampton Chapel. The hymn "Behold the glories of the Lamb" is said to have been the first he composed, and written as an attempt to raise the standard of praise. In answer to requests, others succeeded. The hymn "There is a land of pure delight" is said to have been suggested by the view across Southampton Water. The next six years of Watts's life were again spent at Stoke Newington, in the post of tutor to the son of an eminent Puritan, Sir John Hartopp; and to the intense study of these years must be traced the accumulation of the theological and philosophical materials which he published subsequently, and also the life-long enfeeblement of his constitution. Watts preached his first sermon when he was twenty-four years old. In the next three years he preached frequently; and in 1702 was ordained pastor of the eminent Independent congregation in Mark Lane, over which Caryl and Dr. John Owen had presided, and which numbered Mrs. Bendish, Cromwell's granddaughter, Charles Fleetwood, Charles Desborough, Sir John Hartopp, Lady Haversham, and other distinguished Independents among its members. In this year he removed to the house of Mr. Hollis in the Minories. His health began to fail in the following year, and Mr. Samuel Price was appointed as his assistant in the ministry. In 1712 a fever shattered his constitution, and Mr. Price was then appointed co-pastor of the congregation which had in the meantime removed to a new chapel in Bury Street. It was at this period that he became the guest of Sir Thomas Abney, under whose roof, and after his death (1722) that of his widow, he remained for the rest of his suffering life; residing for the longer portion of these thirty-six years principally at the beautiful country seat of Theobalds in Herts, and for the last thirteen years at Stoke Newington. His degree of D.D. was bestowed on him in 1728, unsolicited, by the University of Edinburgh. His infirmities increased on him up to the peaceful close of his sufferings, Nov. 25, 1748. He was buried in the Puritan restingplace at Bunhill Fields, but a monument was erected to him in Westminster Abbey. His learning and piety, gentleness and largeness of heart have earned him the title of the Melanchthon of his day. Among his friends, churchmen like Bishop Gibson are ranked with Nonconformists such as Doddridge. His theological as well as philosophical fame was considerable. His Speculations on the Human Nature of the Logos, as a contribution to the great controversy on the Holy Trinity, brought on him a charge of Arian opinions. His work on The Improvement of the Mind, published in 1741, is eulogised by Johnson. His Logic was still a valued textbook at Oxford within living memory. The World to Come, published in 1745, was once a favourite devotional work, parts of it being translated into several languages. His Catechisms, Scripture History (1732), as well as The Divine and Moral Songs (1715), were the most popular text-books for religious education fifty years ago. The Hymns and Spiritual Songs were published in 1707-9, though written earlier. The Horae Lyricae, which contains hymns interspersed among the poems, appeared in 1706-9. Some hymns were also appended at the close of the several Sermons preached in London, published in 1721-24. The Psalms were published in 1719. The earliest life of Watts is that by his friend Dr. Gibbons. Johnson has included him in his Lives of the Poets; and Southey has echoed Johnson's warm eulogy. The most interesting modern life is Isaac Watts: his Life and Writings, by E. Paxton Hood. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] A large mass of Dr. Watts's hymns and paraphrases of the Psalms have no personal history beyond the date of their publication. These we have grouped together here and shall preface the list with the books from which they are taken. (l) Horae Lyricae. Poems chiefly of the Lyric kind. In Three Books Sacred: i.To Devotion and Piety; ii. To Virtue, Honour, and Friendship; iii. To the Memory of the Dead. By I. Watts, 1706. Second edition, 1709. (2) Hymns and Spiritual Songs. In Three Books: i. Collected from the Scriptures; ii. Composed on Divine Subjects; iii. Prepared for the Lord's Supper. By I. Watts, 1707. This contained in Bk i. 78 hymns; Bk. ii. 110; Bk. iii. 22, and 12 doxologies. In the 2nd edition published in 1709, Bk. i. was increased to 150; Bk. ii. to 170; Bk. iii. to 25 and 15 doxologies. (3) Divine and Moral Songs for the Use of Children. By I. Watts, London, 1715. (4) The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament, And apply'd to the Christian State and Worship. By I. Watts. London: Printed by J. Clark, at the Bible and Crown in the Poultry, &c, 1719. (5) Sermons with hymns appended thereto, vol. i., 1721; ii., 1723; iii. 1727. In the 5th ed. of the Sermons the three volumes, in duodecimo, were reduced to two, in octavo. (6) Reliquiae Juveniles: Miscellaneous Thoughts in Prose and Verse, on Natural, Moral, and Divine Subjects; Written chiefly in Younger Years. By I. Watts, D.D., London, 1734. (7) Remnants of Time. London, 1736. 454 Hymns and Versions of the Psalms, in addition to the centos are all in common use at the present time. --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================================== Watts, I. , p. 1241, ii. Nearly 100 hymns, additional to those already annotated, are given in some minor hymn-books. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ================= Watts, I. , p. 1236, i. At the time of the publication of this Dictionary in 1892, every copy of the 1707 edition of Watts's Hymns and Spiritual Songs was supposed to have perished, and all notes thereon were based upon references which were found in magazines and old collections of hymns and versions of the Psalms. Recently three copies have been recovered, and by a careful examination of one of these we have been able to give some of the results in the revision of pp. 1-1597, and the rest we now subjoin. i. Hymns in the 1709 ed. of Hymns and Spiritual Songs which previously appeared in the 1707 edition of the same book, but are not so noted in the 1st ed. of this Dictionary:— On pp. 1237, L-1239, ii., Nos. 18, 33, 42, 43, 47, 48, 60, 56, 58, 59, 63, 75, 82, 83, 84, 85, 93, 96, 99, 102, 104, 105, 113, 115, 116, 123, 124, 134, 137, 139, 146, 147, 148, 149, 162, 166, 174, 180, 181, 182, 188, 190, 192, 193, 194, 195, 197, 200, 202. ii. Versions of the Psalms in his Psalms of David, 1719, which previously appeared in his Hymns and Spiritual Songs, 1707:— On pp. 1239, U.-1241, i., Nos. 241, 288, 304, 313, 314, 317, 410, 441. iii. Additional not noted in the revision:— 1. My soul, how lovely is the place; p. 1240, ii. 332. This version of Ps. lxiv. first appeared in the 1707 edition of Hymns & Spiritual Songs, as "Ye saints, how lovely is the place." 2. Shine, mighty God, on Britain shine; p. 1055, ii. In the 1707 edition of Hymns & Spiritual Songs, Bk. i., No. 35, and again in his Psalms of David, 1719. 3. Sing to the Lord with [cheerful] joyful voice, p. 1059, ii. This version of Ps. c. is No. 43 in the Hymns & Spiritual Songs, 1707, Bk. i., from which it passed into the Ps. of David, 1719. A careful collation of the earliest editions of Watts's Horae Lyricae shows that Nos. 1, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16, p. 1237, i., are in the 1706 ed., and that the rest were added in 1709. Of the remaining hymns, Nos. 91 appeared in his Sermons, vol. ii., 1723, and No. 196 in Sermons, vol. i., 1721. No. 199 was added after Watts's death. It must be noted also that the original title of what is usually known as Divine and Moral Songs was Divine Songs only. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) =========== See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

D. S. Warner

1842 - 1895 Person Name: Daniel S. Warner Author of "Conscience Stings" in Timeless Truths Warner, Daniel Sidney. (near Marshallville, Wayne County, Ohio, 1842--1895). Church of God. Reared on an Ohio farm. During the Civil War, he substituted for a brother. Later he taught school. He attended Oberlin College briefly in 1865. By 1867 he was licensed to preach by the Western Ohio Eldership of the Church of God (Winebrennerian). His experience in preaching was gained on circuits in Nebraska and Ohio. In 1874 he was in trouble with the Eldership for preaching entire sanctification. Soon he joined the Indiana Eldership. In 1881 he was in trouble with this Eldership over sectism. Warner was an associate editor of the Herals of Gospel Freedom in 1878. this paper was merged with the Pilgrim about 1881, and the new paper was called the Gospel Trumpet, with Warner as its editor. Warner was forced to move the paper about, seeing for firm financial foundations. The publishing work was at last established in Grand Junction, Michigan, enabling Warner to travel more extensively with a group of evangelists. Warner's time was spent in editing the Trumpet, writing books, tracts, and songs, and making evangelistic tours of the United States. --John W.V. Smith, DNAH Archives =================================== Daniel Sidney Warner, 1842-1895 Born: June 25, 1842, Bris­tol (now Mar­shall­ville), Ohio. Died: De­cem­ber 12, 1895, Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan, of pneu­mon­ia. Buried: Near Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan, at the edge of the Church of God camp­ground that was once there. As of 1880, Warner was liv­ing in Rome Ci­ty, In­di­a­na. His works in­clude: Echoes From Glo­ry, with Bar­ney War­ren (Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan: The Gos­pel Trump­et Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny, 1893) Lyrics-- Ah Poor Ali­en Far from the Fold of Love Ah Poor Sin­ner, Think of Cal­va­ry All This World, Its Wealth and Hon­or All Ye People, Come Down to the Judg­ment Be­gun Along a Dark and Gloomy Path Are You of the Holy Rem­nant Are You Rea­dy, Wait­ing for the Lord? Are You Sow­ing Seeds of Kind­ness? Asleep in Je­sus, Oh, How Sweet A Gentle Hand Un­seen by Us A Long Time I Wan­dered Away Beautiful, Peace­ful Zi­on Behold a Form upon the Lone­ly Mount Behold, What Love, What Bound­less Love Bond of Per­fect­ness, The Borne Away in Mind and Spir­it Brighter Days Are Sweet­ly Dawn­ing By Thy Blessed Word Obey­ing Can the Spir­it of a Mor­tal Church of God, Thou Spot­less Vir­gin Church of the Liv­ing God Come, Be­hold the Love of Je­sus Come unto Me, All Ye That La­bor Come, With­in That Upper Cham­ber Dear Friends, We Have Pre­cious Tidings of Old Don’t Re­sist the Ho­ly Spirit Down into the Flow­ing Ri­ver Do You Tr­iumph, O My Bro­ther? Ere Christ Will Reign Within Thy Heart Fair C­ity of the Gos­pel Day Far Down o’er the Ag­es a Prom­ise Di­vine Fill Me with Thy Spir­it From My Soul and All With­in From the Mount of Heav­en­ly Vi­sion God Is Sit­ting in the Aw­ful Val­ley God Is Sweep­ing through the Na­tions God of Mer­cy, God of Love Great Peace Have They That Love Thy Law Hallelujah to Je­sus! Hark, in the Bi­ble a Warn­ing Hear the Tid­ings of a King­dom Hear the Voice of Our Com­mand­er Hear Ye the Moan of a Soul That Is Lost Here We Meet and Part in Je­sus His Yoke Is Ea­sy How Often I’ve Pondered My Struggles Within How Sweet Is My Walk with Je­sus! How Sweet This Bond of Per­fect­ness I Am Rest­ing in Je­sus, Hal­le­lu­jah! I Know My Name Is There I Heard the Dear Re­deem­er Say I Lost My Life for Je­sus on the Cross I Ought to Love My Sav­ior I Seem to Hear an An­gel Choir I Will Be with Thee, O, Child of Love I Will Part with Thee, Old Mas­ter I Will Trust Thee, O My Fa­ther If Thou Wilt Know the Foun­tain Deep I’ll Sing of a Ri­ver Di­vine In the Cham­bers of Thy Bo­som In the Light of God In the Morn­ing of the Lord Is the Spirit Glow­ing in Thy Heart? It Is Writ­ten in the Bi­ble I’ve Found a Friend in Je­sus I’ve Found My Lord and He Is Mine I’ve Reached the Land of Pure De­light Jesus Drank the Cup of Sor­row Jesus Has Taken My Load of Sin Jesus, Thou a Fount­ain Art Last Great Day, The Let Us Sing an In­vi­ta­tion Let Us Sing a Sweet Song of the Home of the Soul Let Us Sing the Name of Je­sus Life Is Not a Mys­tic Dream Light in Our Dark­ness, Bro­ther Lord Our Shep­herd, The Listen, Sin­ner, to the Voice Lord, the Shades of Night Lo, Heav­en Now Opens to Rap­tur­ous View Lo the King­dom of Hea­ven We See Lo, wisdom Crieth in the Streets Mansion Is Wai­ting in Glo­ry, A Men Speak of a Church Tri­umph­ant Mighty Mes­sen­gers Are Run­ning My Je­sus Died for Me up­on the Cross My Name Is in the Book of Life My Soul in Trou­ble Roamed My Soul Is Sa­tis­fied My Soul Is Saved from Sin Not in the Tem­ples Made with Hands Now My Pil­grim toils Are Over Now the Great King of Ba­bel O Blessed Je­sus, for Thee W Are Wait­ing O Blessed Je­sus, Thy Love Is Su­preme O Careless Sin­ner, Wake to Mer­cy’s Call O God, In­spire Our Morn­ing Hymn O How Can Any­one Re­fuse O How Sublime Is the Life of the Christ­ian O Let Us Sing the Mighty Love O Love Di­vine, Un­fa­thomed! O Praise the Lord, My Soul Is Saved O Precious Bi­ble! Burn­ing Words from Hea­ven O Sin­ner, Come Home to the Sav­ior O W Love the Child­ren’s Mee­ting O What Deep and Pure Com­pas­sion O Wor­ship God, the Fa­ther O Ye Pil­grims, Sing an Ex­hor­ta­tion O’er the Door of Hea­ven’s King­dom Oft My Heart Has Bled with Sor­row Oh, Wor­ship God the Fa­ther, Just and True Oh, Come and Praise the Lord To­day Oh, When We Re­mem­ber the Good­ness O Who Can Stand the Judg­ment Day Oh, Why Should I Be Lost Onward Moves the Great Eter­nal Our God Is Love, the An­gels Know Perishing Souls at Stake Tod­ay! Pilgrim of Je­sus, o’er Life’s Trou­bled Sea Praise the Lord with Songs of Glo­ry Rejoice, Little Ones, in the Pro­mise Di­vine River of Peace Salvation Is the Sweet­est Thing See the Great King of Ba­bel Shall I Tell You Why I Ceased from Fol­ly? Shall My Soul As­cend with Rap­ture Shield of Faith, The Since I Have Found My Sa­vior Sing of Salvation, O, it Was Love Sinner, will You Lose Your Soul Sunbeams Spark­ling and Glanc­ing Sweet Fellowship, Thy Crys­tal Tide Sweetly Whis­pered the Lord in My Mind Take the Shield of Faith, My Bro­ther Tell Me, Pil­grim, Traveling Home­ward Tell Me, Watch­man, Oh, What of the Morn­ing There Are Some Rays of Hope Di­vine There Are Tidings of a Land Far Away There Is a Blest Pa­vil­ion There Is a Grace Few Mor­tals Find There Is a Story I Oft­en Must Pon­der There Is Joy in the Ser­vice of the Mas­ter There Was a Bright and Love­ly Boy There’s an An­gel of Mer­cy from Hea­ven There’s a Fact No Mortal Ever Can Deny There’s a Fount­ain of Blood That Atones for the Soul There’s a Land of Ev­er­last­ing Song There’s a Peace­ful Valley of De­ci­sion Found There’s a Song We Love to Sing There’s an Awful Day That’s Com­ing There’s Mercy, Poor Sin­ner, for Thee There’s Mu­sic in My Soul This Is Why I Love My Sav­ior Tho’ All Along My Hap­py Pil­grim Race Time Enough, the Slug­gard Cries Time On­ward Flows Like a R­iver Vast Trusting in Je­sus, My Sa­vior and Friend ’Twas Sung by the Po­ets Two Little Hands Are Sweet­ly Fold­ed Unheeding Win­ter’s Cru­el Blast Un­i­verse Is God’s Do­main, The We Are Com­ing, Hal­le­lu­jah! We Are Going Home to Hea­ven’s Gold­en City We Are the Hap­py Child­ren We Have Met To­day on the Old Camp­ground We Have Reached an Aw­ful Era We Have Read in Sac­red Sto­ry We Stand upon the Sea of Glass We Tread up­on the Aw­ful Verge We Will Work for Je­sus We’ll Fol­low the Lord All the Way We’re a Hap­py Christ­ian Band What Awful Dark­ness Shrouds All the Earth! When Lost in the Dark­ness of Guilt and Despair When We Pass the Gold­en Sum­mer Where Art Thou, Wan­d’ring Sin­ner? Where Shall We Look for Help in Af­flict­ion? While Sleep­ing Care­less on the Brink Whiter Than Snow Who but the Christ­ian Is Hap­py and Free? Who Can Sing the Won­drous Love of the Son Di­vine?? Who Is My Life but Christ Alone? Who Will Suf­fer with the Sav­ior? Why Should a Doubt or Fear Arise? Why Should a Mor­tal Man Com­plain? Wonderful Fount­ain of Glo­ry --hymntime.com/tch

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